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David R. Hayworth College of Arts and Sciences
Biology
Major Information
Minor Information
Department of Biology

Course Descriptions

View the descriptions in the 2014-2015 Undergraduate Bulletin

BIO 1100. Biology: A Human Perspective (4)

A study of biological principles, with emphasis on their application to the human organism. This course will introduce the student to the process of scientific inquiry along with cell level processes, continuance of the human species and maintenance of the human body. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week, and is recommended for students who are seeking a singlesemester course. Course fee is $25. [N]


BIO 1120. The Human Body and Exercise (4)

This course is designed to present the physiological and musculoskeletal systems as they relate to the biomechanics of exercise. Skeletal, muscular, pulmonary and cardiovascular system structure and function will be emphasized. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Course fee is $25. [N]


BIO 1399. Introduction to Biological Principles and Literature I: Cellular and Molecular Processes (4)

This course is a study of the general principles of living systems with a focus on chemical, cellular, and metabolic levels of biological organization, emphasizing the role of genetics and evolution. The acquisition of primary literature via electronic data retrieval systems will be emphasized. Students will learn to read and interpret research and review papers, write summaries, and present scientific information orally. Three 60-minute lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. Course fee is $25. [N]


BIO 2000. Introduction to Biological Principles and Literature II: Evolutionary and Ecological Processes (4)

This course focuses on basic concepts and applications of evolutionary biology and ecology. Emphasis is given to the mechanisms of evolution, processes that lead to the formation of new species, and methods used to infer evolutionary relationships. Principles of population, community, and ecosystem ecology are also emphasized. Three 60-minute lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BIO 1399 or permission of the instructor.


BIO 2060. Human Physiology (4)

A study of the physical and chemical mechanisms by which human systems function. The focus of the course is on homeostasis, a dynamic equilibrium regulated locally and by neural and endocrine systems. Some pathologies are covered as a means for appreciating normal function. Students will participate in a number of non-invasive activities. Computer-assisted data acquisition is used for some exercises, including reaction times, muscle function, EKGs, spirometry, and breathing rates. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. [N]


BIO 2070. Human Anatomy (4)

A study of the anatomy of the major systems of the human body. All of the systems and their various parts will be covered. Laboratory will consist of models, interactive electronic programs, and where possible, dissection of a representative animal. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week.  [N]


BIO 2110. General Botany (4)

A survey of the diversity of bacteria, algae, fungal protistans, fungi and plants. Reproductive cycles, morphology, economic/ecological importance, phylogeny, and the anatomy and developmental and physiological processes in seed plants will be emphasized. Methods of diversity will be stressed in the laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 1399. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 2120. General Zoology

A survey of the diversity, systematics, and ecology of protozoa and select phyla within the animal kingdom. Basic anatomy, physiology, reproductive processes, development, and behavior of invertebrates and vertebrates will be emphasized in the laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 1399. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Course fee is $25. Four credits.


BIO 2881, 3881, 4881. Special Topics

Variable credit. May be repeated.


BIO 3000. Cell Biology (4)

A study of the cell: its origins, submicroscopic structure, and functions within the context of evolution and the physical laws of nature. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 3030. Vertebrate Histology (4)

A study of the structure and function of tissues. Specialization of cells for specific functions leads to characteristic cellular structure. Laboratory work consists primarily of microscopic examination of prepared slides. Some laboratories teach students how to fix, section, and stain tissues for microscopic examination. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 3040. Microbiology (4)

A study of the fundamental principles and techniques of microbiology, with emphasis on morphology, physiological processes, and parasitic implications of microorganisms (bacteria, molds, yeast, and viruses); methods of control; immunology; and applied microbiology. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and four laboratory hours per week.


BIO 3050. Genetics (4)

This course will review the principles of genetics, including epistasis, polygenes, pedigrees, gene linkage and mapping; along with a review of DNA structure, Central Dogma and biotechnology. Laboratory exercises will include Drosophila crosses, chromosome structure and cytogenetics, and DNA isolation from various organisms with application of fingerprinting techniques. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 3070. Vascular Plant Taxonomy (4)

A study of the morphology, ecology, systematics, and evolution of vascular plants, including collection, identification, and classification of the more common forms. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399, BIO 2110, and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 3080. Vertebrate Natural History (4)

This course is a survey of vertebrate diversity with an emphasis on vertebrate evolution and systematics, functional morphology, life history, ecology, behavior and biogeography. The laboratory portion of the course is field oriented with a focus on the identification, classification and natural history of the regional vertebrate fauna. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 3210. Tools for Biotechnology (4)

This course will introduce students to the basic molecular biological concepts and techniques used in the field of biotechnology. Current progress in DNA technology, as well as microbial, plant and animal biotechnology will be discussed. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor.


BIO 3220. Parasitology (4)

A study of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites from the standpoint of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host-parasite associations, integrated with examples spanning a broad range of topics including parasite community structure, parasite biogeography, and the evolution of host-parasite systems. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO/GBS/ENV 3300. Global Change Ecology (4)

This course surveys the anthropogenic causes and consequences of global change ecology, with emphasis on environmental and economic challenges posed to specific ecosystems and human civilizations around the world. Topics covered will include climate change, ocean acidification, ecosystem services, land use changes, and introduction of non-native species to new habitats. Lectures will be coupled with case studies from recent literature to understand how scientists and governments are addressing the challenges posed by current and projected changes in climate and ecosystems. Prerequisite: BIO 1399 or ENV 1110. [GS]


BIO/GBS 3350. Emerging Infectious Diseases: A World Perspective (4)

This course is designed to provide the student with a strong foundation in the social, environmental, economic, and biological aspects of infectious disease (e.g. AIDS, malaria, SARS, Yellow Fever, Rabies). Students will develop a deeper understanding of the impact that infectious diseases have on the global community. Prerequisite: BIO 1100 or BIO 1399 or permission of the instructor. BIO/GBS 3350 may be taken for biology credit in the major or minor. [GS]


BIO/GBS/ENV 3450. The Hidden Face of Ecuador (4)

This course combines the study of the biodiversity of various ecosystems in Ecuador with Ecuadorian culture. The extensive travel component will allow the students to gain valuable hands-on experiences in several different ecosystems, including highland rainforests, the Amazon rainforest, the coastal plains of the Pacific Ocean and the Galapagos Islands. Prerequisite: any BIO/ENV course. This course is taught in the Spring, with travel to Ecuador in the May term. BIO/GBS 3450 may be taken for Biology credit for the major or minor. [GS, SA]


BIO 3451. Entomology (4)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the diversity, phylogeny, and classification of insects and other related arthropods (spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks). This course will demonstrate not only the value and importance of insects in relation to human health, but also how our economic productivity depends on insects due to agricultural damage/ disease and pollination services. This course will also demonstrate skills for collecting, mounting, and preserving insects for scientific study. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor.


BIO/WGS 3500. Biology of Women (4)

This course will examine the physiology of the adult female body and will address health issues that are unique to or different in women. Emphasis will be placed on the effects of female sex hormones on multiple processes (reproductive, nervous, endocrine, and cardiovascular) in the body.


BIO 4010. Animal Physiology (4)

A study of the physiological activities of animals. The systems and homeostasis are stressed. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 4020. Ecological Plant Physiology (4)

A study of the morphology and physiology of vascular plants within the context of homeostasis. The significance of physiology and relationship to the environment is emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 4030. Developmental Biology (4)

A study of the development of embryos including fertilization, gastrulation, and organogenesis that occur prior to hatching or birth. The course focuses on understanding genes that control development. Changes that occur during maturation, regeneration and aging are also considered. Labs focus on experimental embryology of fish, frogs, chicks, and sea urchins. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 4040. Ecology (4)

A study of the fundamental principles and techniques of ecology, with emphasis on interactions within ecosystems as well as challenging ecological issues. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 4050. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4)

The course includes a comparative study of the anatomy of vertebrates (fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals) with an emphasis on the function, adaptive significance, evolutionary history, and phylogenetic implications of body structures. The lab is a survey of the anatomy of representative vertebrates with an indepth, dissection based study of mammalian anatomy. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 4060. Immunology (4)

A study of the basic concepts and principles, contemporary issues, and current research in the field of immunology, along with discussions regarding vaccine development, autoimmune diseases, transplant immunology and modern immunological diagnostic tools. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor.


BIO 4065. Virology (4)

This course will emphasize the common strategies used by all viruses for successful reproduction within a host cell, survival, and spread with a host population. The molecular basis of alternative reproductive cycles, the interactions of viruses with host organisms, and how these ultimately lead to disease will be presented using examples of representative animal and human viruses. Selected bacterial viruses will also be discussed throughout the semester. Prerequisites: BIO 1399 and BIO 2000.


BIO 4070. Endocrinology (4)

This course examines the major endocrine organs of the body and the processes that are controlled and integrated by hormones. Clinical examples of endocrine diseases (e.g., diabetes, Graves disease) will be explored for the insight they provide regarding endocrine physiology). Prerequisites: BIO 1399 and BIO 2000.


BIO 4080. Neurobiology (4)

This course will cover the physiological and molecular mechanisms of nervous system function. Topics include neuroanatomy; development and differentiation of neuronal cells; chemical and electrical functions; synaptic pharmacology; sensory receptors; learning and memory; and various disease states and medical treatments. Prerequisites: BIO 1399 and BIO 2000.


BIO 4090. Molecular Biology (4)

An advanced consideration of the structure, function, and manipulation of nucleic acids, Topics covered will include DNA, RNA, and protein structure and synthesis, the genetic code, gene regulation, oncogenes, regulation of the cell cycle, and gene cloning. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 and CHM 1010 and CHM 1020, or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.


BIO 4111-4117. Undergraduate Research (1-3)

Biology majors may complete a research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. Students will write of their research in the form of a scientific paper and are encouraged to present their findings at a regional or national conference. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair. One to three credits.


BIO 4444. Independent Study (2)

Individual study and research under the guidance of a member of the department. One to four credits each semester. BIO 4810-4815. Student Internship. Three, four, six, eight, ten or twelve credits. BIO 4980. Biology Journal Club. In this course students will conduct an in depth survey of the primary literature of a biologically relevant topic. Students will be expected to present analyses of primary literature and facilitate a discussion of the topic among those participating in the journal club. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 or permission of the instructor.


BIO 4990. Senior Seminar (2)

The student will review primary literature in a biological area of interest. In consultation with a faculty mentor, the student will present their findings in the writing of a review paper and an oral presentation of their research to a group of peers and faculty. Prerequisite: Senior status.


ENV 1110. Environmental Science (4)

A study of our relationships with the natural world. Fundamental concepts of ecology, awareness of environmental issues, and the need for a sustainable biosphere will be emphasized. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week, and is recommended for students who are seeking a singlesemester course. Course fee is $25.  [N]


ENV 1120. Issues in Environmental Science (4)

This course examines problems associated with the interaction of humans with their environment. Issues concerning resource use and management such as food production, deforestation, fisheries management, soil erosion, water issues, biodiversity loss, and impacts of global climate change will be evaluated. Case studies illustrating specific problems and potential solutions will also be examined. Prerequisites: ENV 1110 and Minor in Environmental Studies, or permission of the instructor. Course consists of two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour lab per week.

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