HPU Poll: North Carolinians Bothered by Lack of Mutual Respect

Posted on:

HIGH POINT, N.C., Oct. 12, 2017 A High Point University Poll finds North Carolinians greatly bothered by a number of possible trends in the country today, including politics being too divisive, minorities facing threats, bad language and poor behavior being accepted in public, and attempts to remove religion from public life.

The recent poll asked North Carolina residents how much a variety of possible trends bothered them. More than half these respondents say they are bothered “a great deal” by

– Politics being too divisive and there being a lack of respect for people who disagree with each other (58 percent)

–  Minorities and people from other countries being made to feel unwelcome and sometimes facing threats of violence (57 percent)

– A more accepting view of bad language and poor behavior in public (56 percent)

– An inability of people of different political views to agree on what is true or not true (54 percent)

– Attempts to remove religion from public life (51 percent)

These same North Carolinians are least likely to say they are bothered a great deal by

– A more permissive culture which threatens traditional family values (38 percent)

– Attempts to place limits on gun rights (35 percent)

“Although there are a lot of things that trouble people about American society today, it is striking that incivility and trends that divide people across social, political and racial or ethnic lines are the most worrisome to majorities of people here in North Carolina,” says Dr. Martin Kifer, director of the HPU Poll and associate professor of political science. “We have seen this in a lot of the polls we have completed. Even as North Carolinians are concerned that these divisions are getting worse, many of them also tend to express interest in finding ways to work beyond them.”

 

All adults – Trends in the country (October 2017)

Here are a number of things that some say are going on in the country today. For each one, please tell me whether this bothers you a great deal, quite a bit, just some, very little or does this not bother you at all? (ORDER OF ITEMS WAS RANDOMIZED)

 

Politics being too divisive and there being a lack of respect for people who disagree with each other

A great deal – 58 percent

Quite a bit – 17 percent

Just some – 16 percent

Very little – 3 percent

Not at all – 3 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 3 percent

 

Minorities and people from other countries being made to feel unwelcome and sometimes facing threats of violence            

A great deal – 57 percent

Quite a bit – 13 percent

Just some – 13 percent

Very little – 5 percent

Not at all – 8 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 3 percent

 

A more accepting view of bad language and poor behavior in public

A great deal – 56 percent

Quite a bit – 11 percent

Just some – 11 percent

Very little – 9 percent

Not at all – 9 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 5 percent

 

An inability for people of different political views to agree on what is true or not true

A great deal – 54 percent

Quite a bit – 17 percent

Just some – 14 percent

Very little – 5 percent

Not at all – 7 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 3 percent

 

Attempts to remove religion from public life

A great deal – 51 percent

Quite a bit – 10 percent

Just some – 11 percent

Very little – 6 percent

Not at all – 18 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 3 percent

 

Media coverage that is biased and favors the establishment

A great deal – 48 percent

Quite a bit – 17 percent

Just some – 11 percent

Very little – 5 percent

Not at all – 12 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 8 percent

 

Increasing acceptance of violence on TV and in the movies

A great deal – 45 percent

Quite a bit – 12 percent

Just some – 15 percent

Very little – 8 percent

Not at all – 18 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 2 percent

 

Elected officials who look out for Wall Street

A great deal – 43 percent

Quite a bit – 15 percent

Just some – 13 percent

Very little – 8 percent

Not at all – 14 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 7 percent

 

The national news media too often ignores the issues of working class Americans

A great deal – 43 percent

Quite a bit – 16 percent

Just some – 21 percent

Very little – 7 percent

Not at all – 9 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 4 percent

 

Companies growing in size and forcing competitors out so there are fewer choices for consumers

A great deal – 42 percent

Quite a bit – 16 percent

Just some – 18 percent

Very little – 8 percent

Not at all – 11 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 4 percent

 

A more permissive culture which threatens traditional family values

A great deal – 38 percent

Quite a bit – 12 percent

Just some – 15 percent

Very little – 9 percent

Not at all – 20 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 6 percent

 

Attempts to place limits on gun rights

A great deal – 35 percent

Quite a bit – 13 percent

Just some – 14 percent

Very little – 11 percent

Not at all – 26 percent

Not sure/Don’t know/Refused – 3 percent

 

(All adult (North Carolina resident) sample surveyed Sept. 28 – Oct. 6, 2017, n = 404 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 4.9 percent)

 

The most recent HPU Poll was fielded by live interviewers at the High Point University Survey Research Center calling on Sept. 28 through Oct. 6, 2017. The responses from a sample of all North Carolina counties came from 404 adults with landline or cellular telephones. The survey has an estimated margin of sampling error of approximately 4.9 percentage points for all adult respondents. The data is weighted toward population estimates for cellular and landline telephone use, age, gender, race, education, and party identification. In addition to sampling error, factors such as question wording and other methodological choices in conducting survey research can introduce additional error into the findings of opinion polls. Details from this survey are available at http://www.highpoint.edu/src/files/2017/10/53memoA.pdf.

Further results and methodological details from the most recent survey and past studies can be found at the Survey Research Center website at http://www.highpoint.edu/src/. The materials online include past press releases as well as memos summarizing the findings (including approval ratings) for each poll since 2010.

The HPU Poll reports methodological details in accordance with the standards set out by AAPOR’s Transparency Initiative, and the HPU Survey Research Center is a Charter Member of the Initiative. For more information, see

http://transparency.aapor.org/index.php/transparency.

You can follow the HPU Poll on Twitter at https://twitter.com/HPUSurveyCenter.

Dr. Martin Kifer, department chair and associate professor of political science, serves as the director of the HPU Poll, and Brian McDonald serves as the associate director of the HPU Poll and an adjunct professor of survey research methods.

 

Share Button

Related Posts