HPU Convocation and Traditions Welcome the Class of 2022

HPU Convocation and Traditions

At the end of the ceremony, it is tradition for HPU students to receive blankets, which HPU President Nido Qubein encourages them to give to someone who has made an impact on their life. Pictured from left to right are Cecilia, Kyle, Gabriela and Rick Fatscher, from Long Island, New York, as Gabriela, a new HPU student, gives her blanket to her family.

HPU Convocation

Thousands of people fill the Roberts Hall lawn for the Convocation Ceremony.

HIGH POINT, N.C., Aug. 19, 2018 – More than 5,000 parents, students and faculty dressed in regalia filled the Roberts Hall lawn at High Point University today. While it looked like a scene from HPU’s graduation, it was the university’s annual Convocation Ceremony, which signals the start of the academic year and sets the stage for the education students will receive in the classroom and beyond.

Dr. Nido Qubein, HPU president, addressed more than 1,500 new students – the largest group of new students in university history. He emphasized that at HPU, they will learn and have the resources to craft lives of not only success, but also significance.

“Success is in the eyes of the beholder,” said Qubein. “Significance has greater clarity. It focuses on the good you do for the world, not just for yourself. It’s about having something worthwhile to do. Someone wonderful to love. Someone meaningful to be. Significance is the outcome of what you do with your success. It is how you become involved at HPU, how you express gratitude to your family and faculty for this opportunity, and how you balance your classes with the need for fellowship and human connection.”

Qubein also emphasized the importance that students learn how to learn in their academic journey.

“Students, you come here armed with your iPhones and iPads and all the conveniences of technology,” said Qubein. “But remember – technology does not distinguish between information and knowledge. You want to access information, but you want to acquire knowledge. Your generation is accustomed to instant access, but you must acquire appreciation for the process of gaining knowledge and scholarship.”

HPU Convocation

HPU President Dr. Nido Qubein addressed more than 1,500 new students – the largest group of new students in HPU’s history. 

During the ceremony, a bald eagle soared across the new students to symbolize the ideals of free enterprise, independence and the ability to pursue new opportunities in America. The same bald eagle will soar over the class during their graduation in four years.

It’s tradition for students to receive a blanket at the end of the ceremony, which Qubein encourages them to give to someone who has made an impact on their life, such as a parent, a teacher or a friend.

“Parents, you’ve spent a lifetime preparing the people you can’t live without to live without you,” said Qubein. “Think about that. You gave them roots. Today, we give them wings.”

Tonight, students will participate in another tradition – the signing of the Honor Code. HPU is a values-based institution, and the University Honor Code signing ceremony sets the tone for academic and personal integrity, character development and the declaration of an honorable community.

HPU Convocation

During the ceremony, a bald eagle soared across the new students to symbolize the ideals of free enterprise, independence and the ability to pursue new opportunities in America. The same bald eagle will soar over the class during their graduation in four years.

A total of 15,000 visitors were brought to the city this weekend for HPU’s annual Welcome Week celebrations.

 

About the Class of 2022:

–They represent 43 different states, plus the District of Columbia, and 37 international countries.

–27 percent are from North Carolina and 73 percent are from across America and the world.

–20 percent of the class are first generation college students.

–The student traveling the farthest to attend High Point traveled 7,672 miles from China. The U.S student traveling farthest traveled 4,696 miles from Hawaii.

–There are 70 valedictorians, salutatorians, high school class and student government presidents and vice presidents.

–There are 15 international languages spoken fluently among your peers.

–Incoming students have completed over 105,000 hours of community service.

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