formats

6.19 AmyWe recently had a bit of a crisis communications situation on our hands here at the National Air and Space Museum, though I won’t go into details because posting about it would defeat the purpose! But it involved one of the historical content of one of the NASM exhibits and could potentially result in bad press for the Museum. In one week there were 250 media hits and we knew we needed to get to work because the “ignore it and it’ll go away” tactic did not work in this case. We had a meeting with all of the relevant personnel and brainstormed what we could do to combat this issue and came up with a lot of great ideas including an essay and Q&A by one of our curators who is one of the best in the field, enlisting partners in the Smithsonian family such as Air & Space Magazine and the Smithsonian Network, pitching our story to media targets, teaming up with other aviation leaders and approaching various newscasters we have relationships with who we know will present the story in an objective and fair manner. It was extremely interesting to view this process from the inside because as the general public we mostly just see the fruits of these labors, not the time that goes into the planning and execution.