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New Fiction

Fantasy    Historical Fiction    Horror    Mystery    Realistic Fiction    Romance    Science Fiction

Below is a list of some of our featured New Fiction Titles available in the ReaderSpace at Smith Library!

Click on your preferred genre above or scroll through to see them all.

                                                              Fantasy

“The Mayan god of death sends a young woman on a harrowing, life-changing journey in this dark, one-of-a-kind fairy tale inspired by Mexican folklore.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“… is at its witty, compelling, and merciless best when it is fully rooted in its setting, a perfectly organic combination of 1920s Jazz Age Mexico and [a] Mayan mythological text… the pleasure of seeing Mayan mythology underlying what at first seems to be a straightforward rendition of the Cinderella trope adds immediate interest to Moreno-Garcia’s work”

– Arkady Martine, NPR

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“Ivy Gamble was born without magic and never wanted it. Ivy Gamble is perfectly happy with her life – or at least, she’s perfectly fine. She doesn’t in any way wish she was like Tabitha, her estranged, gifted twin sister.

Ivy Gamble is a liar.

When a gruesome murder is discovered at The Osthorne Academy of Young Mages, where her estranged twin sister teaches Theoretical Magic, reluctant detective Ivy Gamble is pulled into the world of untold power and dangerous secrets. She will have to find a murderer and reclaim her sister—without  losing herself.”

– Image and description from Macmillan

“Gailey’s debut is an energetic modern fantasy that plays rough with relationships and personal beliefs, from youth to adulthood. Ivy’s emotional investigation will strike a chord in anyone who has ever felt like they don’t belong. Highly recommended for all collections.”

– Kristi Chadwick, Library Journal

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“One pet crow fights to save humanity from an apocalypse in this uniquely hilarious debut from a genre-bending literary author.”

– Image and description from Grand Central Publishing

“…Buxton takes a joyfully original approach to apocalyptic fiction. See, instead of us humans being the focal point in the story of our own extinction, it’s the plethora of life that we leave behind that takes center stage.”

-Ilana Masad, NPR

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

                                                            Historical Fiction

“Things had never been easy between Ava Fisher and her estranged mother Ilse. Too many questions hovered between them: Who was Ava’s father? Where had Ilse been during the war? Why had she left her only child in a German orphanage during the war’s final months? But now Ilse’s ashes have arrived from Germany, and with them, a trove of unsent letters addressed to someone else unknown to Ava: Renate Bauer, a childhood friend. As her mother’s letters unfurl a dark past, Ava spirals deep into the shocking history of a woman she never truly knew.”

“A wealth of history turns Wunderland into a novel that’s both beautiful and devastating. Author Jennifer Cody Epstein (The Painter From Shanghai ) taps into the 1930s prewar era, laying out an unsparing narrative that details tragic events and horrifying legacies.”

  • Barbara Clark, Bookpage
  • See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“Beatriz Williams, the New York Times bestselling author of The Summer Wives, is back with another hot summer read; a dazzling epic of World War II in which a beautiful young “society reporter” is sent to the Bahamas, a haven of spies, traitors, and the infamous Duke and Duchess of Windsor.”

– Description and image from Harper Collins

“From the opening chapter, the book brims with mystery and danger … Lulu’s Bahamas  story line acknowledges the American obsession with British royalty — but thankfully also delves into the not-so-glamorous politics of the times…All in all, however, the novel reminded me of fresh taffy. Warm, salty, a little bitter, and sweet — it pulls the reader in steadily without breaking apart. Elegant prose and imagery grace every page…”

– Denny S. Bryce, NPR

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“For more than thirty years, Claude Ballard has been living at the Hollywood Knickerbocker Hotel. A French pioneer of silent films … [he] now spends his days foraging for mushrooms in the hills of Los Angeles and taking photographs of runaways and the striplings along Sunset Boulevard. But when a film history student comes to interview Claude about The Electric Hotel—the lost masterpiece that bankrupted him and ended the career of his muse, Sabine Montrose—the past comes surging back.”

– Image and description from MacMillan

“…a vital and highly entertaining work about the act of creation, and about what it means to pick up and move on after you’ve lost everything.”

– Stephanie Zacharek, New York Times Book Review

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“In the early 1900s, as the oppression of Russia’s imperial rule takes its toll on Finland, the three Koski siblings—Ilmari, Matti, and the politicized young Aino—are forced to flee to the United States. Not far from the majestic Columbia River, the siblings settle among other Finns in a logging community in southern Washington, where the first harvesting of the colossal old-growth forests begets rapid development, and radical labor movements begin to catch fire.”

– Image and description from Grove Atlantic

“Deep River is an engrossing and commanding historical epic about one immigrant family’s shifting fortunes… Deep River is a feat of lavish storytelling; Marlantes ably balances details about the logging industry and the black markets its cheapskate owners help foster…”

– Mark Athitakis, Washington Post

– See other reviews on Literary Hub

“It is 1914, and the world has been on the brink of war so often, many New Yorkers treat the subject with only passing interest. Eliza Ferriday is thrilled to be traveling to St. Petersburg with Sofya Streshnayva, a cousin of the Romanovs. The two met years ago one summer in Paris and became close confidantes. Now Eliza embarks on the trip of a lifetime, home with Sofya to see the splendors of Russia. But when Austria declares war on Serbia and Russia’s imperial dynasty begins to fall, Eliza escapes back to America, while Sofya and her family flee to their country estate. In need of domestic help, they hire the local fortune-teller’s daughter, Varinka, unknowingly bringing intense danger into their household.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“…Kelly memorably portrays three indomitable women who triumph over hardships and successfully brings a complex and turbulent time in history to life.”

– Publishers Weekly

 

“A page-turning novel about the brilliant, melancholic future president and the two people who knew him best: his handsome and charming confidant (and roommate), Joshua Speed, and the spirited young debutante Mary Todd.”

– Image and description from Workman

“Courting Mr. Lincoln” is intimate, warm and, above all, compassionate. Bayard is concerned with the possibilities of the human heart, and he presents an enigmatic Lincoln seen — and loved — from two other points of a romantic triangle.”

– Connie Ogle, Newsday

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

                                                                   Horror

“When Dorothea’s charitable work brings her to Oakgate Prison, she is delighted by the chance to explore her fascination with phrenology…But when she meets one of the prisoners, the teenaged seamstress Ruth, she is faced with another strange idea: that it is possible to kill with a needle and thread–because Ruth attributes her crimes to a supernatural power inherent in her stitches. The story Ruth has to tell of her deadly creations—of bitterness and betrayal, of death and dresses—will shake Dorothea’s belief in rationality, and the power of redemption”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“…a compelling slice of early Victorian gothic…Vivid and well researched, this book is an evocative portrait of a society that punishes women who dare to contravene social norms…as well as a splendid mystery with suitably melodramatic flourishes.”

– Laura Wilson, The Guardian

 

“A newborn’s absent face appears on the back of someone else’s head, a filmmaker goes to gruesome lengths to achieve the silence he’s after for his final scene, and a therapist begins, impossibly, to appear in a troubled patient’s room late at night. In these stories of doubt, delusion, and paranoia, no belief, no claim to objectivity, is immune to the distortions of human perception. Here, self-deception is a means of justifying our most inhuman impulses—whether we know it or not.”

– Image and description from Coffee House Press

“Song is a skillfully crafted, cleverly executed, and extremely entertaining collection…I wouldn’t call it just a scary book. Instead, I’d call it something that’s harder to achieve: deeply unsettling. Evenson has carved out a space between the weirdness of Jeff VanderMeer and the short-form brilliance of Diane Williams by writing fiction for adults that tickles the backs of our necks, the same way good scary stories did to us in our childhoods.’

– Gabino Iglesias, NPR

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

                                                                 Mystery

“New York Times bestselling author Karin Slaughter returns with another electrifying thriller in the beloved Will Trent mystery series, this time pitting Will and Sara against a mysterious group planning to unleash a deadly epidemic.”

– Image and description from HarperCollins

“Another strong novel by Slaughter, with complex characters to root for and an antagonist you hope gets what he deserves. With a well-written, intriguing plot and an edge-of-the-seat ending, this is sure to keep readers up late into the night.”

– Jodi Gheen, Library Journal

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“The next heart-pounding thriller from New York Times bestselling author Riley Sager follows a young woman whose new job apartment sitting in one of New York’s oldest and most glamorous buildings may cost more than it pays.”

– Description and image from Penguin Random House

“The author…relates ominous events and spooky developments with skill, adding an element of social commentary and a surprise twist ending—elevating this exercise in terror above the ordinary shocker.”

– Tim Nolan, Wall Street Journal

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“The revered New York Times bestselling author returns with a novel set in 1960s Baltimore that combines modern psychological insights with elements of classic noir, about a middle-aged housewife turned aspiring reporter who pursues the murder of a forgotten young woman.”

– Description and image from Harper Collins

“Lippman walks a fine line, balancing a cracking good mystery with the story of a not always admirable woman working to stand on her own. Lippman never loses sight of Maddie’s options and her obstacles … she never loses touch with the twin mysteries at the center of her story … Lippman answers all outstanding questions with a totally cool double twist that your reviewer — a veteran reader of mysteries — never saw coming.”

– Stephen King, New York Times Book Review

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“A young detective who specializes in “tiny mysteries” finds herself at the center of a massive conspiracy in this beguiling historical fantasy set on Manhattan’s Westside—a peculiar and dangerous neighborhood home to strange magic and stranger residents”

– Image and description from Harper Collins

“a fantasy novel that is both literary and convention bending, reading as horror, crime fiction, dark noir, pulp slasher novel, action, and adventure gaming script, hidden-door-anthropological-history, delayed coming-of-age novel…gumshoe mystery, a love letter to pre-Prohibition New York City, and…a disquieting dystopian fable reminiscent of Lewis Carrol’s Alice in Wonderland.”

– Anjanette Delgado, New York Journal of Books

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“The #1 New York Times bestselling author David Baldacci introduces an unforgettable new character: Archer, a straight-talking former World War II soldier fresh out of prison for a crime he didn’t commit.”

– Image and description from Grand Central Publishing

“One Good Deed is filled with the aroma, sounds, hopes, and fears of post-World War II America. Insightful and entertaining, Baldacci has captured the time and events perfectly with authenticity, beauty and flawless prose. Archer is a terrific anti-hero with plenty of longevity and originality built into him for future books. The supporting cast is just as memorable. Gripping from beginning to end.”

– Sam Millar, New York Journal of Books

 

“When a young writer accepts a job at a university in the remote English countryside, it’s meant to be a fresh start…But despite the distractions of her new life…her nerves continue to jangle. To make matters worse, a vicious debate about violence against women inflames the tensions and mounting rivalries in her creative-writing class. When a troubled student starts turning in chapters that blur the lines between fiction and reality, the professor recognizes herself as the main character in his book–and he has written her a horrific fate. Will she be able to stop life imitating art before it’s too late?”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“When the denouement comes, it is well timed to feel both shocking and inevitable: early enough for satisfying resolution afterwards and late enough to keep the reader up long into the night. There is violence, but there is also a very modern interrogation of violent fiction.”

– Sarah Moss, The Guardian

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“On the day a black truck rattles past her house and a Klan flyer lands in her front yard, ten-year-old Beth disappears from her Simmonsville, Georgia, home. Armed with skills honed while caring for an alcoholic mother, she must battle to survive the days and months ahead. Seven years later, Imogene Coulter is burying her father—a Klan leader she has spent her life distancing herself from—and trying to escape the memories his funeral evokes. But Imogene is forced to confront secrets long held by Simmonsville and her own family when, while clearing out her father’s apparent hideout on the day of his funeral, she finds a child. Young and alive, in an abandoned basement, and behind a door that only locks from the outside.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“It’s the kind of writing you would expect from the Edgar-winning author, but it’s made even more powerful here, filled with the purpose of exposing a hateful legacy and issuing a timely warning of its historical ebb and flow.”

– Christine Tran, Booklist

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

                                                                       

“Littleport, Maine, has always felt like two separate towns: an ideal vacation enclave for the wealthy, whose summer homes line the coastline; and a simple harbor community for the year-round residents whose livelihoods rely on service to the visitors. Typically, fierce friendships never develop between a local and a summer girl—but that’s just what happens with visitor Sadie Loman and Littleport resident Avery Greer. Each summer for almost a decade, the girls are inseparable—until Sadie is found dead. While the police rule the death a suicide, Avery can’t help but feel there are those in the community, including a local detective and Sadie’s brother, Parker, who blame her. Someone knows more than they’re saying, and Avery is intent on clearing her name, before the facts get twisted against her.”

– Image and description from Simon & Schuster

“Sharply drawn characters both ground and elevate the bombshell-laden plot, while evocative prose heightens tension and conjures place. Miranda delivers a clever, stylish mystery that will seize readers like a riptide.”

– Publisher’s Weekly

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“Sometimes the price of justice is a good man’s soul. When Marshall McEwan left his Mississippi hometown at eighteen, he vowed never to return. The trauma that drove him away spurred him to become one of the most successful journalists in Washington, DC. But as the ascendancy of a chaotic administration lifts him from print fame to television stardom, Marshall discovers that his father is terminally ill, and he must return home to face the unfinished business of his past.”

– Image and description from Harper Collins

“Though strictly speaking a suspense novel, “Cemetery Road” is, in fact, a great deal more. In the precision and power of its language and its sheer amplitude of detail, Iles’s latest calls to mind the late, great Southern novelist Pat Conroy. Like Conroy, Iles writes with passion, intensity and an absolute commitment to the material at hand…Greg Iles is back and at the top of his game. He couldn’t be more welcome.”

– Bill Sheehan, Washington Post

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“One August afternoon, on the shoreline of the Kamchatka peninsula at the northeastern edge of Russia, two girls–sisters, eight and eleven–go missing. In the ensuing weeks, then months, the police investigation turns up nothing. Echoes of the disappearance reverberate across a tightly woven community, with the fear and loss felt most deeply among its women.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“It has the makings of a lurid thriller, but first-time novelist Julia Phillips…does something more sophisticated than that and turns her unshakable debut into a meditation on the lives of women in a far-flung corner of the world, spanning generations and ethnicities, in the months that follow the disappearance.”

– Barbara VanDenburgh, USA Today

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“Our love story is simple. I met a gorgeous woman. We fell in love. We had kids. We moved to the suburbs. We told each other our biggest dreams, and our darkest secrets. And then we got bored. We look like a normal couple. We’re your neighbors, the parents of your kid’s friend, the acquaintances you keep meaning to get dinner with. We all have our secrets to keeping a marriage alive. Ours just happens to be getting away with murder.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“Downing’s tale unfolds slowly and sinuously, building tension about the couples’ fate while revealing the origins of their homicidal hobby. The first-person, present-tense narration makes readers feel uncomfortably complicit in all that transpires, underscoring the plot’s grim and twisted nature. Readers will eagerly await Downing’s next thriller.”

Publisher’s Weekly

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“Your phone rings. A stranger has kidnapped your child. To free them you must abduct someone else’s child. Your child will be released when your victim’s parents kidnap another child. If any of these things don’t happen: your child will be killed…”

You are now part of the chain…”

– Image and description from Mulholland

“”The Chain” is that rare thriller that ends up being highly personal. Yes, there’s a shadowy force dictating the action, but when it all comes down to its (necessarily) explosive conclusion, the actions of characters are boiled down to familial ethics, understandable motivations, and good old-fashioned revenge, which makes for a satisfying and deeply rewarding read, no matter the season.”

– Tod Goldberg, USA Today

 

“FBI agent Drex Easton is relentlessly driven by a single goal: to outmaneuver the conman once known as Weston Graham. Over the past thirty years, Weston has assumed many names and countless disguises, enabling him to lure eight wealthy women out of their fortunes before they disappeared without a trace, their families left without answers and the authorities without clues. The only common trait among the victims: a new man in their life who also vanished, leaving behind no evidence of his existence . . .”

“Sandra Brown is a master when it comes to rogue characters, increasing the level of tension to cause the pace of the narrative to move faster and faster, with scenes of supersteamy sex. This time she not only nails a story that has several surprises, but also maintains the quality that everyone expects in her novels.”

                                                             Realistic Fiction

“My Life as a Rat follows Violet Rue Kerrigan, a young woman who looks back upon her life in exile from her family following her testimony, at age twelve, concerning what she knew to be the racist murder of an African-American boy by her older brothers. In a succession of vividly recalled episodes Violet contemplates the circumstances of her life as the initially beloved youngest child of seven Kerrigan children who inadvertently “informs” on her brothers, setting into motion their arrests and convictions and her own long estrangement.”

“Oates’ frequent themes of exile, predators and their victims, racial conflicts, and gender violence coalesce in this psychologically and socially complex portrait of a young woman’s struggle as she loses her family but finds herself.”

 

“On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous is a letter from a son to a mother who cannot read. Written when the speaker, Little Dog, is in his late twenties, the letter unearths a family’s history that began before he was born — a history whose epicenter is rooted in Vietnam — and serves as a doorway into parts of his life his mother has never known, all of it leading to an unforgettable revelation. At once a witness to the fraught yet undeniable love between a single mother and her son, it is also a brutally honest exploration of race, class, and masculinity.”

“Ocean Vuong’s devastatingly beautiful first novel, as evocative as its title, is a painful but extraordinary coming-of-age story about surviving the aftermath of trauma…Vuong’s language soars as he writes of beauty, survival, and freedom, which sometimes isn’t freedom at all…”

 

“The author of Other People’s Houses and The Garden of Small Beginnings delivers a quirky and charming novel chronicling the life of confirmed introvert Nina Hill as she does her best to fly under everyone’s radar.”

– Description and image from Penguin Random House

“…a feel-good book that shines, one that offers a heroine we can root for from page one. Nina’s fight against chaos—her pleas to be left alone, left to her planning and schedules and quiet—feels authentic … You will impress at your next dinner party or, who we are kidding, book club meeting, if you spew even a few of the trivia facts Nina hordes in her always-on head.”

– Angela Haupt, Washington Post

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“When Marilyn Connolly and David Sorenson fall in love in the 1970s, they are blithely ignorant of all that’s to come. By 2016, their four radically different daughters are each in a state of unrest: Wendy, widowed young, soothes herself with booze and younger men; Violet, a litigator-turned-stay-at-home-mom, battles anxiety and self-doubt when the darkest part of her past resurfaces; Liza, a neurotic and newly tenured professor, finds herself pregnant with a baby she’s not sure she wants by a man she’s not sure she loves; and Grace, the dawdling youngest daughter, begins living a lie that no one in her family even suspects. Above it all, the daughters share the lingering fear that they will never find a love quite like their parents.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“The fun—well, that’s in the reading of the novel, which nicely blends comedy with pathos and the sharp with the soft-edged.”

– Joanne Kaufman, The Wall Street Journal

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“Toby Fleishman thought he knew what to expect when he and his wife of almost fifteen years separated…He could not have predicted that one day…Rachel would just drop their two children off at his place and simply not return. He had been working so hard to find equilibrium in his single life. The winds of his optimism, long dormant, had finally begun to pick up. Now this. As Toby tries to figure out where Rachel went… his tidy narrative of the spurned husband with the too-ambitious wife is his sole consolation. But if Toby ever wants to truly understand what happened to Rachel and what happened to his marriage, he is going to have to consider that he might not have seen things all that clearly in the first place.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“The author’s sharp wit and descriptions of a certain urban privileged life are dead-on and often hilarious. The novel feels fresh and modern with a satirical edge, but enough truth to sting even the schmoopiest of married couples…Infusing candor, humor and social commentary, this book holds up a mirror to all of us, demanding that we take a hard look at how we live and how we love.”

– Brooke Lefferts, Associated Press

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“Beekeeper Holly McNee Jensen quietly lives in a world of her own on Sullivan’s Island, tending her hives and working at the local island library…Her mother, a devoted hypochondriac, might be unaware that she’s quite ill but that doesn’t stop her from tormenting Holly. To escape the drama, Holly’s sister Leslie married and moved away…Holly’s escape is to submerge herself in the lives of the two young boys next door and their widowed father, Archie. Her world is upended when the more flamboyant Leslie returns and both sisters, polar opposites, fixate on what’s happening in their neighbor’s home…”

– Image and description from Harper Collins

“Full of Low Country flavor and brilliantly imagined characters, this laugh-out-loud-hilarious novel with a wistful edge will satisfy anyone who wants to see flawed people getting second chances.

– Publisher’s Weekly

 

“When the renowned poet Fiona Skinner is asked about the inspiration behind her iconic work, The Love Poem, she tells her audience a story about her family and a betrayal that reverberates through time.”

– Image and description from Harper Collins

“Told through a retrospective lens, the tales of these four carry an almost mythological weight, and Conklin’s wise, sharp prose makes this book the sort you want to press into the hands of someone you love as soon as you finish”

– Eliot Schrefer, USA Today

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“Two sisters, one farm. A family is split when their father leaves their shared inheritance entirely to Helen, his younger daughter. Despite baking award-winning pies at the local nursing home, her older sister, Edith, struggles to make what most people would call a living. So she can’t help wondering what her life would have been like with even a portion of the farm money her sister kept for herself.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“…weaves together a bittersweet but heartwarming generational story of family, tragedy, perseverance and forgiveness…This hopped-up story will make your smile with its droll humor, and its poignant moments will stop you to reread and confirm that they are really that good. In beer-geek slang, Stradal’s novel is “crushable” – easygoing, well-balanced, super-drinkable with tons of flavor …”

– Don Oldenburg, USA Today

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“Fifteen-year-old Ilya arrives in Louisiana from his native Russia for what should be the adventure of his life: a year in America as an exchange student. The abundance of his new world…is as hard to fathom as the relentless cheerfulness of his host parents. And Sadie, their beautiful and enigmatic daughter, has miraculously taken an interest in him. But all is not right in Ilya’s world: he’s consumed by the fate of his older brother Vladimir…Just before Ilya left, the murders of three young women rocked the town’s usual calm, and Vladimir found himself in prison. With the help of Sadie…Ilya embarks on a mission to prove Vladimir’s innocence.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“Fitzpatrick does so many things right in “Lights All Night Long,” it’s hard to believe it’s a debut novel. As a mystery, it’s paced perfectly…Fitzpatrick proves to be an expert at building suspense; it’s hard not to read the book in a single sitting.”

– Michael Shaub, Los Angeles Times

– See other reviews on Literary Hub

 

“One morning, Jessa-Lynn Morton walks into the family taxidermy shop to find that her father has committed suicide, right there on one of the metal tables. Shocked and grieving, Jessa steps up to manage the failing business, while the rest of the Morton family crumbles. For the first time, Jessa has no choice but to learn who these people truly are, and ultimately how she fits alongside them.”

– Image and description from Tin House

“..it’s darkly funny, both macabre and irreverent, and its narrator is so real that every time I stopped reading the book, I felt a tiny pull at the back of my mind, as if I’d left a good friend in the middle of a conversation … “

– Ilana Masad, NPR

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“In this bravura follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize, and National Book Award-winning #1 New York Times bestseller The Underground Railroad, Colson Whitehead brilliantly dramatizes another strand of American history through the story of two boys sentenced to a hellish reform school in Jim Crow-era Florida.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“It’s a masterpiece squared, rooted in history and American mythology and, yet, painfully topical in its visions of justice and mercy erratically denied.

– Maureen Corrigan, NPR

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle class peers. After a messy break up from her long-term white boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places…including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth. As Queenie careens from one questionable decision to another, she finds herself wondering, “What are you doing? Why are you doing it? Who do you want to be?”—all of the questions today’s woman must face in a world trying to answer them for her.”

– Image and description from Simon & Schuster

“Queenie as a tragicomic story of womanhood, updated for the Tinder age perhaps, with a black body occupying a space already familiar to its white predecessors. But that would be to profoundly underestimate this debut novel, which tells a far deeper story than the one it has been compared to.”

– Afua Hirsch, Time

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“Mi-ja and Young-sook, two girls living on the Korean island of Jeju, are best friends that come from very different backgrounds. When they are old enough, they begin working in the sea with their village’s all-female diving collective, led by Young-sook’s mother. As the girls take up their positions as baby divers, they know they are beginning a life of excitement and responsibility but also danger… The Island of Sea Women is an epoch set over many decades, beginning during a period of Japanese colonialism in the 1930s and 1940s, followed by World War II, the Korean War and its aftermath, through the era of cell phones and wet suits for the women divers.”

– Image and description from Simon & Schuster

“A stupendous multigenerational family saga, See’s…latest also provides an enthralling cultural anthropology highlighting the soon-to-be-lost, matriarchal haenyeo phenomenon and an engrossing history of violently tumultuous twentieth-century Korea. A mesmerizing achievement.”

– Terry Hong, Booklist

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

      

“No. It is a simple word, uttered on a summer porch in 1936. And it will haunt Kitty Milton for the rest of her life. Kitty and her husband, Ogden, are both from families considered the backbone of the country. But this refusal will come to be Kitty’s defining moment, and its consequences will ripple through the Milton family for generations. For while they summer on their island in Maine, anchored as they are to the way things have always been, the winds of change are beginning to stir.”

– Image and description from MacMillan

“…The Guest Book proudly owns the appeal of an old-fashioned sweeping storyline, and in so doing, complicates many of its characters beyond their shallow first impressions. In fact, one of the most engaging characters here defends the essential human yearning for a good story.”

– Maureen Corrigan, NPR

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“Xuan Juliana Wang’s remarkable debut introduces us to the new and changing face of Chinese youth. From fuerdai (second-generation rich kids) to a glass-swallowing qigong grandmaster, her dazzling, formally inventive stories upend the immigrant narrative to reveal a new experience of belonging: of young people testing the limits of who they are, in a world as vast and varied as their ambitions. In stories of love, family, and friendship, here are the voices, faces and stories of a new generation never before captured between the pages in fiction.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“Wang’s style has an authenticity that derives from a “global” workshop-free perspective, an authorial fluidity that reveals a thoroughly enlightened study of character beyond all cultural expectations. Her characters are millennials and Chinese or Chinese Americans, but their lives, like Chekhov’s characters, are ordinary lives set in bold relief against the ordinary. The extraordinary appears and is magically absorbed into the familiar, like a dazzling new coat slipped on over old clothes.”

– Carol Muske-Dukes, Los Angeles Review of Books

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“One evening, eight Mennonite women climb into a hay loft to conduct a secret meeting. For the past two years, each of these women, and more than a hundred other girls in their colony, has been repeatedly violated in the night by demons coming to punish them for their sins. Now that the women have learned they were in fact drugged and attacked by a group of men from their own community, they are determined to protect themselves and their daughters from future harm. While the men of the colony are off in the city, attempting to raise enough money to bail out the rapists and bring them home, these women-all illiterate, without any knowledge of the world outside their community and unable even to speak the language of the country they live in-have very little time to make a choice: Should they stay in the only world they’ve ever known or should they dare to escape?”

– Image and description from Bloomsbury Publishing

““Women Talking” is a wry, freewheeling novel of ideas that touches on the nature of evil, questions of free will, collective responsibility, cultural determinism and, above all, forgiveness.

– Jennifer Reese, New York Times Book Review

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“Bette Howland herself was an outsider―an intellectual from a working-class neighborhood in Chicago; a divorcée and single mother, to the disapproval of her family; an artist chipped away at by poverty and perfection. Each of these facets plays a central role in her work. Mining her deepest emotions for her art, she chronicles the tension of her generation.”

– Image and description from A Public Space

“Largely autobiographical and incredibly self-aware, Howland’s stories conjure vivid portraits of her home city of Chicago and bring to life the hypnotic thoughts of her narrators among their wide casts of vividly drawn characters.”

– Publisher’s Weekly

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

“In these eight powerful, emotionally absorbing stories, a romance unexpectedly sparks between two wounded friends; a marriage ends for what seem like noble reasons, but with irreparable consequences; a young woman holds on to an impossible dream even as she fights for her survival; two lovers reunite after unimaginable tragedy, both for their country and in their lives; a baby’s christening brings three generations of a family to a precarious dance between old and new; a man falls to his death in slow motion, reliving the defining moments of the life he is about to lose.”

-Image and description from Penguin Random House

“The stories in “Everything Inside” were published over a 12-year period…What brings them together… are Danticat’s precise yet emotionally charged prose and the way she has curated this slim volume, bringing its elements together to create a satisfying whole.”

 

                                                                 Romance

“It all starts with a fall from a ladder…But the accident, which happens while Maddie is sorting through long-forgotten personal mementos and photos, results in more than a broken ankle. It changes her life.  Spurred by old memories… Maddie embarks on a road trip.  She hopes to answer questions about the men she loved and might have married—but didn’t—in the years after she was left alone with three young children. Wearing a cast and driving a rented SUV, she sets off to reconnect with three very different men…to know once and for all if the decisions she made long ago were the right ones. Before moving forward into the future, she is compelled to confront the past.”

 

“From the host of NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast comes a heartfelt debut about the unlikely relationship between a young woman who’s lost her husband and a major league pitcher who’s lost his game.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“Linda Holmes’ debut novel…is a nuanced, extraordinarily ordinary adult love story that is as romantic as it is real. Like most love stories, there are flirtatious moments that will bring a blushing smile to the faces of the sappiest romantics, but they are sweetly and sparingly intermixed with the melancholy and mundane moments that also make up all relationships.”

– Mary Cadden, USA Today

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

Ayesha Shamsi has a lot going on. Her dreams of being a poet have been set aside for a teaching job so she can pay off her debts to her wealthy uncle. She lives with her boisterous Muslim family and is always being reminded that her flighty younger cousin, Hafsa, is close to rejecting her one hundredth marriage proposal. Though Ayesha is lonely, she doesn’t want an arranged marriage. Then she meets Khalid, who is just as smart and handsome as he is conservative and judgmental. She is irritatingly attracted to someone who looks down on her choices and who dresses like he belongs in the seventh century. When a surprise engagement is announced between Khalid and Hafsa, Ayesha is torn between how she feels about the straightforward Khalid and the unsettling new gossip she hears about his family. Looking into the rumors, she finds she has to deal with not only what she discovers about Khalid, but also the truth she realizes about herself.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“Despite the similarities in the premises, Ayesha at Last is more than just a Muslim retelling of Austen’s work; Jalaluddin constructs a timely and enlightening narrative that validates the experiences of many South Asians and Muslims today, while weaving in universal themes of identity, class, and discrimination.”

– Kamrun Nesa, NPR

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

  

“Jenna Boltz’s life is at a crossroads. After a messy divorce from her surgeon husband nearly twenty years ago, she raised her two children on her own, juggling motherhood with her beloved job as a Seattle intensive-care nurse. Now that Paul and Allie have gone to college and moved out, Jenna can’t help but wonder what her future holds. Her best friend, Maureen, is excited for Jenna’s newfound independence. Now is the perfect time to finally book the trip to Paris they’ve been dreaming of since their college days. But when it comes to life’s other great adventure—dating—Jenna still isn’t sure she’s ready to let love in . . . until an unexpected encounter begins to change her mind.

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“…this heartwarming story sweetly balances friendship and mother-child bonding with romantic love.”

– Kirkus Reviews

 

“Cassie Hanwell was born for emergencies. As one of the only female firefighters in her Texas firehouse, she’s seen her fair share of them, and she’s a total pro at other people’s tragedies. But when her estranged and ailing mother asks her to give up her whole life and move to Boston, Cassie suddenly has an emergency of her own. The tough, old-school Boston firehouse is as different from Cassie’s old job as it could possibly be. Hazing, a lack of funding, and poor facilities mean that the firemen aren’t exactly thrilled to have a “lady” on the crew… Except for the infatuation-inspiring rookie, who doesn’t seem to mind having Cassie around. But she can’t think about that. Because love is girly, and it’s not her thing. And don’t forget the advice her old captain gave her: Never date firefighters. Cassie can feel her resolve slipping…and it means risking it all—the only job she’s ever loved, and the hero she’s worked like hell to become.”

– Image and description from MacMillan

“Center gives readers a sharp and witty exploration of love and forgiveness that is at once insightful, entertaining, and thoroughly addictive.”

Kirkus Reviews

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

                                                          Science Fiction

“An alien ship rests over Water Island. For five years the people of the US Virgin Islands have lived with the Ynaa, a race of superadvanced aliens on a research mission they will not fully disclose. They are benevolent in many ways but meet any act of aggression with disproportional wrath. This has led to a strained relationship between the Ynaa and the local Virgin Islanders and a peace that cannot last.  A year after the death of a young boy at the hands of an Ynaa, three families find themselves at the center of the inevitable conflict, witness and victim to events that will touch everyone and teach a terrible lesson.”

“A compelling read of an invasive occupation and emotional uprising, Turnbull’s debut is a must for all libraries. The author, who crafts speculative stories featuring black characters on par with Octavia Butler, is definitely one to watch.”

 

“In these nine stunningly original, provocative, and poignant stories, Ted Chiang tackles some of humanity’s oldest questions along with new quandaries only he could imagine.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“Reading this book felt like being seated at dinner with a friend, one who will explain the state of the sciences to you without an ounce of condescension, making you a participant in the knowledge. It is as generous as it is marvelous, and I’m left feeling nothing so much as grateful for it.”

– Amal El-Mohtar, New York Times Book Review

– See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“More than fifteen years after the events of The Handmaid’s Tale, the theocratic regime of the Republic of Gilead maintains its grip on power, but there are signs it is beginning to rot from within. At this crucial moment, the lives of three radically different women converge, with potentially explosive results.
Two have grown up as part of the first generation to come of age in the new order. The testimonies of these two young women are joined by a third voice: a woman who wields power through the ruthless accumulation and deployment of secrets.”

– Image and description from Penguin Random House

“…Atwood’s sheer assurance as a storyteller makes for a fast, immersive narrative that’s as propulsive as it is melodramatic.”

– Michiko Kakutani, New York Times Book Review

–  See more reviews on Literary Hub

 

“1992: After a confrontation at a riot grrl concert, seventeen-year-old Beth finds herself in a car with her friend’s abusive boyfriend dead in the backseat, agreeing to help her friends hide the body…

2022: Determined to use time travel to create a safer future, Tess has dedicated her life to visiting key moments in history and fighting for change…

Tess and Beth’s lives intertwine as war breaks out across the timeline–a war that threatens to destroy time travel and leave only a small group of elites with the power to shape the past, present, and future

“Another Timeline is a matryoshka doll meditation on the pointlessness and necessity of violence… It has the rhythms of punk rock, the weird, stuttering speed of nostalgia, fierce bonds of friendship and a hard question strung all the way through it: If your past is your past and the story that brings you unerringly to this moment and the person that you are in it, what risk do you take in changing it?”

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