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Student Government Association
Student Government Association

University Honor Code

Preamble

We, the students of High Point University, believe that honesty and integrity are essential to student development, whether personal, social, or academic. Therefore, we assert that:

Every student is honor-bound to refrain from conduct which is unbecoming of a High Point University student and which brings discredit to the student and/or to the University;

  • Every student is honor-bound to refrain from cheating;
  • Every student is honor-bound to refrain from collusion;
  • Every student is honor-bound to refrain from plagiarism;
  • Every student is honor-bound to confront a violation of the University Honor Code;
  • Every student is honor-bound to report a violation of the University Honor Code.

INTERPRETATION OF THE HONOR CODE

History. The University Honor Code originated within the Senate of the Student Government Association, was adopted by students in a general referendum, by the faculty (April 17, 1997), by the Administrative Council, and by the Board of Trustees.

Authority. Although the University Honor Code cannot exist without the involvement of faculty and staff, the University Honor Code was created by students and shall be maintained and enforced by the Judicial Board of the Student Government Association.

Pledge. Acceptance of an offer of admission from High Point University constitutes de facto endorsement of the University Honor Code; and, therefore, professors may ask students to sign the following oath: On my honor, I have abided by the High Point University Honor Code.

Definitions. For purposes of interpreting the University Honor Code, the following definitions shall apply:

Cheating. Cheating includes, but is not limited to:

  • the use of unauthorized information during testing or examination; the submission, in whole or in part, of the ideas or work of another as one’s own;
  • completing academic work for another student who later submits said work, in whole or in part, as her/his own;
  • submission of the same or similar work in two or more classes without the approval of the instructor(s) involved.

Collusion. Collusion includes, but is not limited to:

agreements or conspiracies entered into for fraudulent or illegal purposes;

discussing or otherwise describing the content of a test or examination with a student who will take a similar examination in the same course at a later period;

forgery for purposes of deception.

Property violations. Property violations include, but are not limited to:

  • Appropriation (see University Conduct Code);
  • the misappropriation of patents, copyrights, trademarks, or computer software;
  • securing information from the Internet or similar sources without paying the required fees or royalties, where prescribed;
  • the destruction or corruption of information technologies intended for common use;
  • the misappropriation of library resources intended for common use;
  • forgery for purposes of theft.

Plagiarism. Plagiarism involves quoting or paraphrasing without proper acknowledgment. You plagiarize if you submit, without appropriate documentation or quotation marks:

  • part or all of written or spoken statements derived from sources, such as books, the Internet, magazines, pamphlets, speeches, or oral statements;
  • part or all of written or spoken statements derived from files maintained by individuals, groups or campus organizations;
  • the sequence of ideas, arrangement of material, or pattern of thought of someone else, even though you express such processes in your own words.

Acknowledgment. Proper acknowledgment includes identifying the author and source of a quoted or paraphrased passage and indicating clearly ( by the appropriate use/omission of quotation marks or indention’s) whether the passage is being quoted or paraphrased.

Style. You should purchase a good writer’s handbook during your first semester. The St. Martin’s Handbook (Third Edition, St. Martin’s Press), which is the textbook for English 104, is recommended and is available in the University Bookstore. You will find this handbook especially useful throughout your university career, including graduate school. Moreover, even if you are exempted from English 104, you should seriously consider taking English 104 an as elective- especially if you intend to enter graduate or professional school.

Reference. The St. Martin’s Handbook contains summaries of the four most widely used style manuals, including the APA ( American Psychological Association), the CBE (Council of Biology Editors), the CMS ( The Chicago Manual of Style), and the MLA (Modern Language Association) manuals. For student writers, a shorter version of the CMS Manual, ordinarily referred to as the Turbian Manual, is ordinarily adequate.

Primary use: research in the social science:

American Psychological Association. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 4th ed. Washington, D.C.: APA, 1994.

Primary use: research in life and physical science:

Council of Biology Editors. Scientific Style and Formal: The CBE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers. 6th ed. New York: Cambridge UP, 1994.

Primary use: research in the fine arts, history, and the humanities

Chicago Manual of Style (as summarized by Kate Turabian). Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Term Papers. 5th ed. Ed. Bonnie Birtwistle Honigsblum. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1987.

Primary use: research in literature and language

Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 4th ed. New York: MLA, 1995.

Initiation of Charges. Any member of the High Point University community, including members of the faculty, the staff, or the student body, may request an investigation if (s)he has reason to believe that a student is in violation of the University Honor Code. If the case is related to a particular class, the instructor of that class shall investigate the case and shall initiate charges, if appropriate (see Original Jurisdiction: Academic Violations, page 92 of A Guide to Campus Life.) If the case is not related to a particular course (e.g., appropriation, forgery, property violations), the dean of students shall investigate the case and shall initiate charges, if appropriate (see Original Jurisdiction: Non-Academic Violations, page 92 of A Guide to Campus Life

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS

Because a University cannot perform its proper function in the absence of academic integrity and social responsibility and because you are a member of this University community, you are expected:

  • to demonstrate academic integrity personally;
  • to confront violations of the University Honor Code;
  • to notify instructors when you believe that violations have occurred, regardless of whether or not you choose to identify the suspected offenders or yourself.

Academic Integrity. By practicing the following guidelines, you can help assure that you will not be suspected of academic dishonesty:

  • where material is quoted, use quotation marks if the quotation involves fewer than four or fewer lines; indent, using double spacing, passages, which are longer than four lines;
  • where material is paraphrased, be sure the wording is distinctly different from the original source because you will have plagiarized if you use any word order and/or grammatical structure original with the author of the source, except where material is indented or placed in quotation marks;
  • where material is paraphrased, quoted, or otherwise appropriated for academic use, acknowledge the author and source;
  • do not take dictionaries, notes, or textbooks into the classroom during a major test without the consent/direction of the instructor;
  • be sure that notes and texts are closed and out of sight during quizzes;
  • do not communicate with other students during a text or quiz;
  • do not discuss the content of a test or examination with a student who is scheduled to take a similar test or examination in a different section of the same course.

Confrontation. Although the University Honor Code does not prescribe the method of confrontation, although such confrontation may be either direct or indirect, and although civility is expected in all situations, you are expected to confront in some manner persons suspected of violating the University Honor Code. You may:

  • talk directly with the person you suspect of violating the University Honor Code, advising her/him that (s)he is incriminating her/himself and explaining the moral and legal consequences of violating the University Honor Code;
  • ask another member of the University community to talk with the person you suspect of violating the University Honor Code, advising her/him that (s)he is incriminating her/himself, and explaining the moral and legal consequences of violating of the University Honor Code;
  • report a violation to the instructor, to the vice president for academic affairs, to the dean of students, or to the attorney general of the student government association.

Notification. Often faculty are not aware when students cheat in their classes. Although the University Honor Code does not require to identify persons suspected of violating the code, it does require students to advise their instructor when they have reason to believe that violations have occurred. Faculty will be in better position to help reduce violations if they are aware that violations may be occurring.

Right to Report. Although the University Honor Code does not require students to report persons who violate the code, members of the University community are encouraged to report suspected violators directly to the instructor or by submitting Form OSL 101 (Honor Code Incident Report) to the Office of Student Life The form is available from the Office of Student Life [101 Slane University Center].

Original Jurisdiction. Violations of the University Conduct Code may be academic or non-academic in nature.

Academic violations. If you are suspected of academic violations of the University Honor Code, the instructor will meet with you to discuss the charges. If, after the conference, the instructor concludes that the charges are grounded, (s)he may (1) adjudicate the case directly, (2) refer the case to the University Honor Court through the Office of the Dean of Students, or (3) allow you to choose between the two options. Ordinarily, before meeting with you to discuss the charges and options, the instructor will check your file in the Office of Student Life to determine whether prior sanctions have been imposed for violations of the University Honor Code. Ordinarily, if the instructor concludes that the charges are grounded and where prior sanctions have been imposed for violations of the University Honor Code, the case will be referred directly to the University Honor Court. The following conditions apply:

  • prior sanctions should not be imposed if the case is assigned to the University Honor Court;
  • cases must be assigned to the University Honor Court where it is believed that sanctions greater than failure in the course should be considered;
  • by assigning a case to the University Honor Court, the instructor simultaneously assigns tot he Court the right to impose the full range of sanctions delineated below.

Non-academic Violations. In cases involving non-academic violations of the University Honor Code, the dean of students may (1) adjudicate the case directly, (2) assign the case to the University Honor Court, or (3) allow you to choose between the two options. Ordinarily the case will be assigned directly to the University Honor Court if prior sanctions have imposed for violations of the University Honor Code.

PROCESS OF ADJUDICATION

If you are suspected of violating the University Honor Code, the following procedures ordinarily shall apply:

  1. Your instructor (or the dean of students where cases involve non-academic violations of the University Honor Code) will check your file in the Office of Student Life to determine whether you have previously been sanctioned for violating the University Honor Code;
  2. Your instructor (if the case involves academic violations) or the dean of students (if the case involves non-academic violations) will meet with you to discuss the issue;
  3. If, after this conference, the instructor or the dean of students is persuaded that a violation of the University Honor Code, did, in fact, occurs, the instructor or the dean of students (1) may adjudicate the case directly; (2) may refer the case to the University Honor Court; or (3) may allow you to choose between the two options;
  4. Where the instructor (academic violations) or the dean of students (non-academic violations) concludes that charges are grounded, the case ordinarily will be referred to the University Honor Court if the accused has previously been sanctioned for violating the University Honor Code;
  5. The case must be referred to the University Honor Court if the instructor believes that sanctions greater than failure in a course should be considered;
  6. If the case is referred to the University Honor Court, the attorney-general of the Student Government Association, in collaboration with the dean of students and the chief justice of the Student Government Association, shall schedule a hearing;
  7. Where a case is referred to the University Honor Court, judicial procedures, as delineated for cases involving original jurisdiction, shall apply (see page 118-119 in A Guide to Campus Life).

SANCTIONS

Academic Violations. The following sanctions ordinarily shall be imposed for violations of the University Honor Code, with the understanding that where extenuating circumstances exist, sanctions may be probated:

First Infraction. As a minimum, a student who violates the University Honor Code shall receive the grade zero (0) on the assignment; as a maximum, the student shall receive an F in the course. Where sanctions are imposed, whether by the instructor, by the dean of students, or by the University Honor Court, an Honor Code Incident Report [Form OSL 101] should be filed with the Office of Student Life.

Second Infraction. As a minimum, the student shall receive the grade F in the course and shall be suspended for a minimum of 9 days; as a maximum, the student shall be suspended for the semester. In the event that the student is suspended for the semester, (s)he shall receive the grade F in the course where the infraction occurred. In other courses, the student shall receive the mark which is appropriate at the time of the withdrawal (W, WP, WF).

Non-Academic Violations. Where violations of the University Honor Code are non-academic in nature, the possible sanctions shall be the same as those which may be imposed for violations of the University Honor Code.

SPECIAL NOTICES

Academic Forgiveness. In the event that a student repeats a course at High Point University which (s)he previously failed for violations of the University Honor Code, both the “F” and the repeat grade will be computed in the grade-point average, with the result that the normal repeat policy does not apply.

Appeals. Disciplinary sanctions imposed by the instructor, by the dean of students, or by the University Honor Court may be appealed by following the appellate procedures described on page 119 of A Guide to Campus Life.

Records. When sanctions are imposed by the instructor, by the dean of students, or by the University Honor Court for violations of the University Honor Code, From OSL 101 (Honor Code Incident Report) should be filed in the Office of Student Life. A copy of the form should be sent to the student and to the instructor in cases where the instructor has referred the student to the University Honor Court.

Policies for the retention and disposal of records are describe on pages 5-6 of A Guide to Campus Life.

Refunds. In the event that a student is excluded from the University, the regular refund policy described in the Undergraduate Bulletin, the Bulletin of the Evening Degree Program, or the Graduate Bulletin shall apply. In the event that a student is excluded from selected courses, programs or facilities for violations of the University Honor Code, monies due, of payable will not be refunded in whole or part.

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF STUDENT LIFE

Our office is located on the third floor of the Slane Student Center. We are open daily from 8:30am – 5pm.

(336) 841-9231
(336) 841-4513 (fax)

E-mail: studentlife@highpoint.edu

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