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Summer Advantage

2019 Course Offerings

Get Ahead. Stay Ahead. 

2019 Course Offerings

During Summer Advantage 2019, students will have the opportunity to complete eight credit hours via two options:

  • Option 1 includes taking two 4-credit courses which will fulfill general education requirements (graduation requirements).
  • Option 2 includes taking one 4-credit course that will fulfill a general education requirement, one 3-credit study skills course (ADV 1101; an elective course), and one 1-credit physical education course (a general education requirement) or EXP 1401 (an exploration in choosing a major at High Point University).
  • Note: COM 1112/1113 is offered as a hybrid course, combining 2 two-credit hour courses.

Students will identify their preferences and course options on the SA2019 registration form.  Student Success Coaches will share schedules with students the first week of June 2019.

 

Morning Class Options

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:

ART 2090 Introduction to Ceramics  This is a basic course in ceramics with an emphasis in hand-built forms. The methods of pinch, slab, coil, and hump will be used to familiarize the students with clay and clay building. Students will learn the language and terminology used in ceramics. Through various projects students will gain confidence with observational analysis; technical, interpretive, and inventive skills; self-expression; and personal interests. Students will learn the stages of clay from its origin in the ground through the firing and glazing stages. Group and individual critiques will be included in the course to increase awareness, questioning, and self-evaluation. Through research, the student will demonstrate an awareness of an appreciation for the works of ceramic artists from our culture and other cultures. The student will develop knowledge about the early history of ceramics. Four credits. Satisfies the Performing/Visual Arts General Education Requirement.

COM 2001 Techniques in Media Production Learn from the best, right from the beginning. Taught by Broadcaster-in-Residence Joe Michaels, an 8-time EMMY Award winner and long-time Director of NBC’s Today Show, COM 2001 is an introductory level video production class, centering on basic techniques of field production and editing. Students will cover pre-production, production, and post-production skills through hands-on exercises. The class will particularly emphasize basic, shooting, editing, audio, and lighting techniques. These skills will prepare students for successful completion upper-level video classes. Four credits.

FYS 1000 Do You See What I See? Semiotics and Society (Section 02). Semiotics, the study of signs and sign systems extends the notion of text beyond the written page to any artifact that can “stand for” something else—not only pictures, sounds, gestures, and body language, but also objects and even the spaces between them! Signs and sign systems are the basis of the intentional codes that create cultural meanings, so in this sense, the course researches the ways we practice communication. Semiotics is therefore the study of making meaning (both “encoding” and “decoding”) in its widest possible sense. It is concerned with the description of sign systems and the codes (“rules” and conventions) that structure meaning, as well as the particular instances or events in which signs are constructed. In this course, we will focus on the work of semioticians in the areas of myth, photography, film, television, and subculture and consider how semiotic concepts and methods can be used to analyze a variety of cultural products, from fashion to television to news to literature. Four credits. Satisfies the First Year Seminar General Education Requirement.

FYS 1000 The Real World? Images of Leadership in Contemporary Media (Section 03)— Images of leaders in contemporary media are often a betrayal to real world expectations and requirements for today’s emerging professionals.  This seminar will explore the modern presentation of leaders in the media, investigate the implications of those images, and debate the consequences of generational perspectives on leading others in real world settings.  Select television episodes and contemporary films will be viewed through an investigative and deliberative framework of leader portrayal and association.  Readings on modern leadership, contemporary management expectations, generational differences in the workplace, diversity, and interpersonal communication approaches will be completed. Course requirements will also include class discussions, reflective essays, structured off-campus observations and interviews, a group project, and a final paper/presentation utilizing evidence gathered from television and film as the basis for student research. Four credits. Satisfies the First Year Seminar General Education Requirement.

FYS 1000 Talking About Freedom— Using the story of race in America, this course examines the theory of Popular Constitutionalism, or the idea that citizens working outside the courts shape constitutional law and consider how social movements and political mobilizations give rise to new meanings for and expression of constitutional values. Key moments in the struggle for freedom, civil rights and equality created important junctures in the history of constitutional law and show that a wide range of social actors drive change by participating in America’s unique and dynamic constitutional culture. In the long view of history, it’s not the judges, but the people, who decide what their Constitution means. 4 credits. Satisfies the First Year Seminar General Education Requirement.

HST 1201 American Beginnings to 1800 This course is a survey of Native American contact with Europeans, cultural interactions in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and the Revolution that created the United States. Four credits. Satisfies the History General Education Requirement. 

MTH 1110 Topics in Contemporary Math – Illustrations of contemporary uses of mathematics, varying from semester to semester, frequently including topics from: graph theory, theory of apportionment, voting theory and methods, counting methods, probability, personal finance, and game theory. Four credits. Satisfies Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement; based on math placement/major.

PEC 1021 Aerobic/Fitness Walking  This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of aerobic/fitness walking.  Students will learn to improve cardiovascular fitness by participating in a walking program and promoting walking as a potential lifetime activity.  One credit. Satisfies PEC Activity General Education Requirement. This course is paired with ADV 1101.

PEC 1071 Yoga I This course is designed to teach students the basic discipline of yoga, which includes, the proper breather, relaxation techniques and correct body positions. Students will learn to demonstrate yoga and develop a “vinyasa” or “flow” to their practice. One credit. Satisfies PEC Activity General Education Requirement. This course is paired with ADV 1101.

PEC 1311 Weight Training I  This course is designed to teach students to use progressive resistance exercises as a means for body toning, and general strength development. Students will learn how to setup a workout program using weight machines and free weights. One credit. Satisfies PEC Activity General Education Requirement. This course is paired with ADV 1101.

REL 1001 Old Testament StudiesA course examining the history and religious perspective of ancient Israel as revealed through the text of the Hebrew Bible and pertinent Near Eastern texts. The focus of study is upon the context of the Old Testament in light of its historical background, as revealed through modern critical research, literary, and historical methods. Four credits. Satisfies the Religion General Education Requirement.

THE 1200 Fundamentals of Acting An introduction to Stanislavski-based actor training including studies and exercises designed to develop the student’s abilities to create a character. Students will explore basic improvisation, stage movement, monologue, scene work, and script analysis as tools for characterization. Four credits.  Satisfies the Performing/Visual Arts General Education Requirement.

 

Afternoon Class Options

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:

ART 2090 Introduction to Ceramics – This is a basic course in ceramics with an emphasis in hand-built forms. The methods of pinch, slab, coil, and hump will be used to familiarize the students with clay and clay building. Students will learn the language and terminology used in ceramics. Through various projects students will gain confidence with observational analysis; technical, interpretive, and inventive skills; self-expression; and personal interests. Students will learn the stages of clay from its origin in the ground through the firing and glazing stages. Group and individual critiques will be included in the course to increase awareness, questioning, and self-evaluation. Through research, the student will demonstrate an awareness of an appreciation for the works of ceramic artists from our culture and other cultures. The student will develop knowledge about the early history of ceramics. Four credits. Satisfies the Performing/Visual Arts General Education Requirement.

COM 1112/1113 Mediated Communication Systems: Audio and Video Software/Graphic Software Packages. Introduction to the digital technologies employed by the media industries to record, store, edit and deliver information to audiences. This hybrid course provides an introduction to audio and video software packages, plus an introduction to graphic software packages. Students begin a digital portfolio. 4 credits. This course satisfies requirements for most majors and minors within the School of Communication and is encouraged as an elective for students in all majors. See Course Catalog to verify inclusion in your major track. 

EXP 1401 Exploring Your Major and Career Path  Not sure of your major? It’s ok. You’re not alone. Each year, hundreds of High Point University students begin classes without having decided on a major. And even those who have often change their major. This course will empower you to make a quality decision about your major, based on your individual goals and interests. EXP 1401 provides students with the opportunity to explore various career opportunities and decision-making strategies, which will assist them in their personal, academic, and professional development as well as career-related goal-setting. Particular emphasis is placed on developing awareness of self in a professional environment. One credit. This course is paired with ADV 1101.

FYS 1000 Do You See What I See? Semiotics and Society (Section 02). Semiotics, the study of signs and sign systems extends the notion of text beyond the written page to any artifact that can “stand for” something else—not only pictures, sounds, gestures, and body language, but also objects and even the spaces between them! Signs and sign systems are the basis of the intentional codes that create cultural meanings, so in this sense, the course researches the ways we practice communication. Semiotics is therefore the study of making meaning (both “encoding” and “decoding”) in its widest possible sense. It is concerned with the description of sign systems and the codes (“rules” and conventions) that structure meaning, as well as the particular instances or events in which signs are constructed. In this course, we will focus on the work of semioticians in the areas of myth, photography, film, television, and subculture and consider how semiotic concepts and methods can be used to analyze a variety of cultural products, from fashion to television to news to literature. Four credits. Satisfies the First Year Seminar General Education Requirement.

 FYS 1000 The Real World? Images of Leadership in Contemporary Media (Section 04)— Images of leaders in contemporary media are often a betrayal to real world expectations and requirements for today’s emerging professionals.  This seminar will explore the modern presentation of leaders in the media, investigate the implications of those images, and debate the consequences of generational perspectives on leading others in real world settings.  Select television episodes and contemporary films will be viewed through an investigative and deliberative framework of leader portrayal and association.  Readings on modern leadership, contemporary management expectations, generational differences in the workplace, diversity, and interpersonal communication approaches will be completed. Course requirements will also include class discussions, reflective essays, structured off-campus observations and interviews, a group project, and a final paper/presentation utilizing evidence gathered from television and film as the basis for student research. Four credits. Satisfies the First Year Seminar General Education Requirement.

HST 2202 American Moments – A course focused on particular years of decades in American history, studying decisive events, people, and changes in the context of broader themes in the United States. The course will focus on the chronological moment and its legacy in historical and popular memory. Selection of chronological moments will vary with the assigned instructors for the sections of the course. Four credits. Satisfies the History General Education Requirement.  This summer’s HST 2202 topic: The Salem witchcraft trials are notorious in American history, representing a seemingly irrational moment in early America when Puritan superstitions and disdain for deviance produced accusations, prosecutions, and killings of many innocents.  Because of the event, the Puritans have a historical reputation as uptight hypocrites, and the term “witch hunt” condemns the referent as an absurd pursuit of phantom evils.  We will explore the witchcraft trials, their background and context, and their legacy in American history, and we’ll discover even more implications of the events and the term.  Several case studies and a host of trial records await our consideration.

PEC 1032 Cardio Kettlebell. The purpose of this class is to provide students with the fundamentals of exercise with a kettlebell. Students will learn cardio fitness and strength training through the different movements of the kettlebell swing. Students will also learn how to create their own kettlebell workout routine. One credit. Satisfies PEC Activity General Education Requirement. This course is paired with ADV 1101.

PEC 1071 Yoga I –This course is designed to teach students the basic discipline of yoga, which includes, the proper breather, relaxation techniques and correct body positions. Students will learn to demonstrate yoga and develop a “vinyasa” or “flow” to their practice. One credit. Satisfies PEC Activity General Education Requirement. This course is paired with ADV 1101.

PEC 1152 Basketball  – This course is designed to teach students a general knowledge of basketball. Students will learn the principles, techniques, safe practices, strategies and sportsmanship of basketball along with improve their skills and general physical fitness. One credit. Satisfies PEC Activity General Education Requirement. This course is paired with ADV 1101.

REL 1003 Sacred Experiences in World Religions This course will explore the phenomenon of religion as found within numerous historical and cultural contexts. Although no single religious tradition will be treated comprehensively, materials from the following traditions will be selected in order to better examine the thematic issues that animate the religious dimension of the human experience: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Shinto, Jainism, Buddhism, and Confucianism.. Four credits. Satisfies the Religion General Education Requirement.

THE 1200 Fundamentals of Acting – An introduction to Stanislavski-based actor training including studies and exercises designed to develop the student’s abilities to create a character. Students will explore basic improvisation, stage movement, monologue, scene work, and script analysis as tools for characterization. Four credits.  Satisfies the Performing/Visual Arts General Education Requirement.



Elective Course – offered in both Morning and Afternoon options

ADV 1101 Foundations for Academic Success – An academic and life skills course designed to help create greater success and to provide an opportunity to learn and to adopt methods to promote success in college course work, careers, relationships, and life in general. Students will learn how to read college textbooks with special emphasis on improving reading comprehension and ability and application to other reading. Students will also learn to improve comprehension and note taking skills and apply other learning techniques relating to learning styles, processing information, managing time effectively, setting goals, increasing concentration, reducing stress and procrastination, improving listening skills, preparing for test, and performing well on tests with a variety of question formations. Three credits.  Will not satisfy a General Education Requirement.  Elective credit course that is appropriate for students who desire additional assistance with study skills.   This course is paired with a PEC class or EXP 1401.

 

Contact Student Success

Available: Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:00pm
Location: Second floor of Cottrell Hall
Questions: studentsuccess@highpoint.edu