May 24th, 2019

National Science Foundation

Hello, fellow global citizens, it is Kaila coming at you live at The Washington Center!

This afternoon after visiting the ASCD we got the opportunity to go to the National Science Foundation or NSF for short. As a science teacher, I was very excited about this experience. In my head, I had pictured this place as basically the Bill Nye the Science Guy playground. I was ready for a children science museum, but for grown adults, like myself. After my first glimpse of the building, I had a dreadful feeling that I was wrong. I soon came to the realization that this was indeed a government building and the security that we went through proved that. Going through the security checkpoint at NSF made the seriousness of going through airport security during Christmas time seem like a walk in the park.

After getting our badges we were able to meet with Dr. Finbarr Sloane and Dr. Alejandra Sorto in a board room. Dr. Sloane’s job at NSF is to assign grants to people in the field who are doing research related to STEM and education. Most of this research is occurring in classrooms working with students in order to investigate what education practices work best related to STEM education. Dr. Sorto is a fellow that is learning and working with Dr. Sloane. She is a professor at a university in Texas and teaches a mathematics methods course to pre-service educators.

Dr. Sloane took time to share with us different resources and programs that the NSF has to offer teachers. A lot of resources would be most applicable to teachers who are seeking their doctorate degree, but they inspired us with different ideas for future careers paths. Dr. Sloane also gave us a quick overview of what is going on at the NSF and Dr. Sorto gave us more resources that would be helpful for teachers in mathematics. As a whole, the meeting at the NSF was very informational.  As always, thanks for the support! Till next time y’all!

-Kaila

Dr. Sloane discussing a math problem with us and addressing different ways a student may approach the problem.