HPU Poll: NC Public Prefers Compromise on Health Care and State Budget

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HIGH POINT, N.C., April 5, 2017 – The new High Point University Poll finds that despite the highly polarized political environment, majorities of North Carolinians prefer elected representatives to seek common ground on issues like health care and the North Carolina state budget. 

The poll found that 61 percent of North Carolinians say that Democrats in Congress should spend more time working with President Donald Trump, while 30 percent say more time should be spent opposing what Trump is trying to accomplish. 

This desire for compromise extends to the issue of health care where 50 percent of North Carolina residents now say they approve of the 2010 health care reform law Congress passed and former President Barack Obama signed into law, compared to the 42 percent who approved of the law in a February 2015 HPU Poll. A majority (52 percent) of North Carolinians favor repealing some parts of the Affordable Care Act and keeping other parts, while 21 percent support repealing all of the health care law and 24 percent support not repealing any of the law.

The preference for compromise includes state budget priorities in Raleigh too. A majority of North Carolina residents (60 percent) say that they would like to see a budget that includes a balanced amount of both the governor’s and General Assembly’s priorities, compared to 13 percent who say they would like to see more of Gov. Roy Cooper’s priorities reflected and 9 percent who say they prefer more of the General Assembly’s priorities in the budget.

Most citizens, however, do not know very much about the state budget debate. Only 8 percent of the poll’s respondents say they have heard a lot about Cooper’s budget proposal, and 62 percent say they have not heard much at all about it. Meanwhile, a total of 40 percent say they approve of the proposal, compared to a total of 19 percent who say they disapprove. Forty-two do not offer an opinion one way or another.

“Many North Carolinians maintain a belief that elected representatives can address policy problems in a way that includes input from the executive and legislative branches,” Brian McDonald, associate director of the HPU Poll. “Citizens do not always understand the complexities of the issues, but the issues of health care and the state budget are examples of areas where compromise would be welcomed by the public.”

 

heatlh careAll adults – Democrats Working with President Trump (March 2017)

Should Democrats in Congress spend more time working with President Trump or more time opposing what President Trump is trying to accomplish?

Working with – 61 percent

Opposing – 30 percent

(Don’t know/Refuse) – 9 percent

(All adult (North Carolina resident) sample surveyed March 25 – 30, 2017, n = 416 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 4.8 percent)

 

All adults – Approval of Obamacare/Affordable Care Act (March 2017)

In 2010, Congress passed and President Obama signed into law a health reform bill. Based on what you know about this law, would you say you approve or disapprove of the law?

Approve – 50 percent

Disapprove – 44 percent

(Don’t know/Refuse) – 6 percent

(All adult (North Carolina resident) sample surveyed March 25 – 30, 2017, n = 416 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 4.8 percent)

 

Health CareAll adults – Repeal of Obamacare/Affordable Care Act (March 2017)

This law is often referred to as the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare. Do you think President Trump and Congress should repeal all of that health care law, should repeal parts of the healthcare law but keep other parts, or should not repeal any of the Affordable Care Act?

Repeal all – 21 percent

Repeal parts – 52 percent

Not repeal any of the law – 24 percent

(Don’t know/Refuse) – 4 percent

(All adult (North Carolina resident) sample surveyed March 25 – 30, 2017, n = 416 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 4.8 percent)

 

All adults – Attention to Governor’s Budget Proposal (March 2017)

As you may know, Governor Cooper recently introduced a budget that reflected his policy priorities. How much would you say you have heard about his budget proposal?

A lot – 8 percent

A little bit – 27 percent

Not much at all – 62 percent

(Don’t know/Refuse) – 3 percent

(All adult (North Carolina resident) sample surveyed March 25 – 30, 2017, n = 416 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 4.8 percent)

 

All adults – Approval of Governor’s Budget Proposal (March 2017)

Overall, and based on what you know about Governor Cooper’s budget proposal, how much would you say you approve or disapprove of his priorities?  Would you say you strongly approve, somewhat approve, somewhat disapprove, or strongly disapprove?

Strongly approve – 10 percent

Somewhat approve – 30 percent

Somewhat disapprove – 13 percent

Strongly disapprove – 6 percent

(Don’t know/Refuse) – 42 percent

(All adult (North Carolina resident) sample surveyed March 25 – 30, 2017, n = 416 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 4.8 percent)

 

All adults – Support for Governor’s or General Assembly’s Budget Priorities (March 2017)

The General Assembly will pass a version of the budget that Governor Cooper must accept or reject. Do you think that budget should include many more of the Governor’s priorities, many more of the General Assembly’s priorities, or a balanced amount from both?

More of governor’s priorities – 13 percent

More of General Assembly’s priorities – 9 percent

Balanced amount of both – 60 percent

(Don’t know/Refuse) – 19 percent

(All adult (North Carolina resident) sample surveyed March 25 – 30, 2017, n = 416 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 4.8 percent)

 

The most recent HPU Poll was fielded by live interviewers at the High Point University Survey Research Center calling on March 25–30, 2017. The responses from a sample of all North Carolina counties came from 416 adults with landline or cellular telephones. The survey has an estimated margin of sampling error of approximately 4.8 percentage points for all adult respondents. The data is weighted toward population estimates for cellular and landline telephone use, age, gender, and race. In addition to sampling error, factors such as question wording and other methodological choices in conducting survey research can introduce additional error into the findings of opinion polls. Details from this survey are available at http://www.highpoint.edu/src/files/2017/04/52memoA.pdf.

Further results and methodological details from the most recent survey and past studies can be found at the Survey Research Center website at http://www.highpoint.edu/src/. The materials online include past press releases as well as memos summarizing the findings (including approval ratings) for each poll since 2010.

The HPU Poll reports methodological details in accordance with the standards set out by AAPOR’s Transparency Initiative, and the HPU Survey Research Center is a Charter Member of the Initiative. For more information, see

http://transparency.aapor.org/index.php/transparency.

You can follow the HPU Poll on Twitter at https://twitter.com/HPUSurveyCenter.

Dr. Martin Kifer, associate professor of political science, serves as the director of the HPU Poll, and Brian McDonald serves as the associate director of the HPU Poll.

 

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