HPU Poll: NC Voters See Economy, Bipartisanship as Key Issues in NC Senate Race

HIGH POINT, N.C., Oct. 30, 2014 – For those who have and will vote in North Carolina’s mid-term election, the HPU Poll finds that two issues may affect for whom they cast the ballot: the economy and the ability to work across party lines.

The latest poll of likely and actual voters (those who say they’ve already completed early voting) finds that in a list of key issues such as terrorism, health care, immigration and the economy, it is the economy (35 percent) that carries the most weight in determining who gets voters’ support.

When it comes to sticking to principles or bipartisanship, 50 percent say they support the candidate who can work with people of the other party while 44 percent say they support the candidate who sticks to his or her principles.

“North Carolina voters give attention to other issues such as health care and education, but the economy continues to be their biggest concern,” says Brian McDonald, assistant director of the HPU Poll. “They also lean toward a candidate who could work across parties to solve these major issues. This isn’t surprising as we’ve seen the approval rating of Congress plummet during times of deadlock.”

 

Likely and actual voters – Important Issues

Which one of the following issues is most important in deciding your vote for U.S. Senate in November?

Economy – 35 percent

Terrorism – 9 percent

Health care – 18 percent

Immigration – 6 percent

Deficit – 6 percent

International conflicts – 3 percent

Education – 14 percent

Something else – 6 percent

Not sure – 3 percent

(North Carolina likely and actual voter sample surveyed between Oct. 21 and 25, n = 802 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 3.5 percent)

 

Likely and actual voters – Candidate Characteristics

Which of these candidate characteristics is more important to you in casting your ballot for the U.S. Senate this year – that the person sticks to their own principles, or that the person will work with people of the other party?

Sticks to his or her own principles – 44 percent

Work with people of the other party – 50 percent

Not sure – 6 percent

(North Carolina likely and actual voter sample surveyed between Oct. 21 and 25, n = 802 and margin of sampling error approximately = +/- 3.5 percent)

 

The High Point University Survey Research Center contracted SurveyUSA to interview 862 state of North Carolina registered voters Oct. 21 through Oct. 25, 2014, using Registration Based Sample (aka Voter List Sample) purchased from Aristotle in Washington, D.C. To be included in the sample, a voter needed to have voted in both 2010 and 2012, or needed to have newly registered to vote thereafter. Of the 862 registered voters, 802 were determined to be likely to vote or had already voted in person or by absentee ballot in the Nov. 4, 2014 general election. Approximately 10 percent of the respondents said they had already voted. This research was conducted 100 percent by telephone. Respondents reachable on a home telephone (72 percent of likely voters) were interviewed on their home telephone in the recorded voice of a professional announcer. Respondents not reachable on a home telephone (28 percent of likely voters) were contacted by live operators, who hand-dialed the telephone, secured the respondent’s cooperation, qualified the respondent, conducted the interview, and remained on the phone until the call was completed. Crosstabs of this study are available at http://www.highpoint.edu/src/files/2014/10/PDF-North-Carolina-Political.pdf.

Further results and methodological details from the most recent survey and past studies can be found at the Survey Research Center website at http://www.highpoint.edu/src/. The materials online include past press releases as well as memos summarizing the findings (including approval ratings) for each poll since 2010.

You can follow the HPU Poll on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/SurveyResearchCenter and Twitter at http://twitter.com/HPUSurveyCenter.

Dr. Martin Kifer, assistant professor of political science, serves as the director of the HPU Poll, and Brian McDonald serves as the assistant director of the HPU Poll.

Share Button