HPU’s Nursing Program Awarded Grant to Treat Underserved Communities

Jul 25th, 2022

HPU’s Nursing Program Awarded Grant to Treat Underserved Communities

High Point University’s Department of Nursing was recently awarded a $12,550 grant to further the clinical education of the university’s nursing students by the Greensboro Area Health Education Center (AHEC). Dr. Racquel Ingram, founding chair of the Department of Nursing, is pictured left working with students in HPU’s new nursing program space.


HIGH POINT, N.C., July 25, 2022 – The Greensboro Area Health Education Center (AHEC) has awarded High Point University’s Department of Nursing a $12,550 grant to further the clinical education of the university’s inaugural nursing students, who will join the HPU family this fall.

The grant will provide an opportunity for the Community Clinic of High Point (CCHP) to become an official clinical site for HPU’s pre-licensure nursing students, allowing students to gain experience working in primary care clinics for at-risk and underserved populations.

  “The partnership with HPU’s nursing program will provide significant support to patients through education and direct patient care, leading to improved patient compliance and health outcomes,” says Molly Jordan, executive director of the Community Clinic of High Point and a ’93 graduate. “As a High Point University alum, I am absolutely thrilled to have the opportunity to work with HPU students to improve our community and keep High Point healthy.”

In the spring, students will have experiential learning opportunities at the CCHP by managing the care of diabetes and hypertension for underinsured and low-income patients in a collaborative, team-based care approach. Nursing students will also collaborate with other HPU health science programs, including athletic training and pharmacy, at the CCHP.

HPU Sweet Heart Nursing 2
Dr. Ingram will welcome the first cohort of nursing students this fall.

“This funding for HPU’s nursing program is providing a necessary clinical site within the local community that formally educates nursing students alongside other health care disciplines,” says Dr. Racquel Ingram, founding chair for the Department of Nursing. “Students will assist in diverse, underinsured and underserved populations to help bridge gaps associated with health inequities. It also assists with the preparation of extraordinary nursing students by providing experiences that they might not otherwise encounter.”

The grant-funded program will officially be called the “Sweet-Hearts Program” at the Community Clinic of High Point. Ingram explains the naming of the program is inspired by focusing on diabetic patients and hearts focusing on the cardiovascular patients. Nursing students will also be able to use the CCHP to engage with underserved communities by providing health education, medication management, exercise, nutrition and other preventative services.

“We are inspired to be an integral part of the genesis of the HPU nursing program, which is advancing interprofessional education and practice,” says Shawn Houcke, coordinator for the Greensboro AHEC. “The new clinical training site for nursing students, in partnership with the Community Clinic of High Point, aligns greatly with the mission of the NC AHEC Program.”

Funding is provided to support clinical faculty salary, educational materials and supplies, teaching tools and equipment, and gas mileage in the form of stipends to the university. The AHEC provides support for educational activities and services with a focus on primary care in rural and underserved communities.

HPU’s Department of Nursing will welcome its first cohort of nursing students this fall.