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Webb School Of Engineering
Computer Science

Course Descriptions

CSC1210 Web Development I (Offered Spring Semesters)
An introduction to the technologies related to creation of a World Wide Web site.
Emphasis will be placed on the latest languages and techniques used to create a dynamic site. Other topics may include image editing, simple animations, human-computer interaction and multimedia. Each student will participate in a series of projects that focus on the creation of an inter-active web site. Credit cannot be earned after successful completion of CSC 3212. Four credits.
CSC1610 Introduction to Programming for Data Analytics (Offered Spring Semesters)
An introduction to the fundamentals of programming for data science and analytics using the R and
Python programming languages. Topics include assignment statements, factors, vectors, lists and data frames. Applications center around statistical computing and data visualization. Four credits.
CSC 1710 Introduction to Programming (Offered Fall Semesters)
An introduction to the fundamentals of programming using a high-level, structured programming language such as C. Emphasis will be placed on syntax and semantics of the language to write correct, efficient, and easily modifiable programs. Topics include but not limited to assignment statements, conditional and iterative control structures, functions, simple data structures, and software development. Four credits.
CSC 1720 Advanced Programming with Data Structures (Offered Fall Semesters)
This is a continuation of CSC 1710 covering more advanced fundamentals of programming including
problem-solving strategies, the concept of an algorithm and basic data structures in an object-oriented language such as C++. Various programming concepts will be introduced such as recursion, string processing, records, sorting, searching, linked lists, trees and object oriented programming. Prerequisite: CSC 1710 with a grade of C- or higher. Four credits.
CSC 2212 Database Systems (Offered Spring Semesters)
This course covers database design and the use of databases in web, mobile and cloud applications. It includes extensive coverage of the relational model, relational algebra, and SQL as well as NoSQL designs. The course also features database design and relational design principles based on dependencies and normal forms. There will be a programming project, which explores database design and
management by utilizing appropriate features of SQL. Prerequisite: CSC 1720. Four credits.
CSC 2342 Discrete Structures (Offered Spring Semesters)
This is an introductory course in discrete mathematical structures widely used computer science. The purpose of this course is to understand and use (abstract) discrete structures that are backbones of computer science. This course teaches the students techniques in how to think logically and mathematically and apply these techniques in solving problems. In particular, this class is meant to introduce logic, proofs, sets, relations, functions, counting, and probability, with an emphasis on applications in computer science. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSC 1720. Four credits.
CSC 2410 Computer Systems (Offered Spring Semesters)
An introduction to instruction set architecture, microarchitecture, and system architecture.
Topics include basic computer organization, central processor and memory, addressing techniques, data representation, fundamental programming techniques in assembly and machine language as it relates to operating systems and high level languages. The course also includes exposure to networking and communication as well as parallel and distributed computing. Prerequisite: CSC 1720. Four credits.
CSC 2710 Advanced Data Structures with Algorithm Development (Offered Fall Semesters)
This is a continuation of CSC 1720 where the focus is on algorithm development utilizing advanced data
structures such as graphs and trees. Various programming strategies will be addressed such as greedy, Divide and Conquer, backtracking, branch and bound and dynamic programming. Other topics include recursion, algorithm analysis, object oriented programming and event driven programs. Prerequisites: CSC 1720 with a grade of C- or higher and MTH 1410 or equivalent. Four credits.
CSC 3212 Web Technologies (Offered Spring Semesters)
A study of advanced web technologies with an emphasis on full stack development including usage of a database to facilitate the retention and delivery of information. Various scripting languages such as PHP and JavaScript will be used during the course. Each student will participate in a series of projects that will focus on creation of a dynamic interactive web site. Prerequisite: CSC 2212.
Four credits.
CSC 3250 Artificial Intelligence (Offered Even Spring Semesters)
This course will introduce the basic ideas and techniques of AI by emphasizing the building of agents, environments, and systems that can be considered as acting intelligently. By the end of this course, you will have built autonomous agents that efficiently make decisions in fully informed, partially observable and adversarial settings. Your agents will draw inferences in uncertain environments and optimize actions for arbitrary reward structures. The techniques you learn in this course apply to a wide variety of artificial intelligence problems and will serve as the foundation for further study in any application area you choose to pursue. Prerequisites: CSC 2710 and one statistics or probability course. Four credits.
CSC 3312 Mobile App Development (Offered Fall Semesters)
An introduction to the fundamentals of application development on mobile devices such as the cell phone or tablet. Students will work in an integrated development environment to write native apps for the selected platform. Current platforms include Eclipse/Android SDK or Xcode/iOS SDK. Emphasis will be placed on the user interface and the syntax and semantics of the language to write correct, efficient, and easily modifiable mobile applications. Prerequisite: CSC 2212 and CSC 2410. Four credits.
CSC 3360 Visual Effects, Animation and Computer Graphics (Offered Even Fall Semesters)
An in-depth examination of how graphics are implemented on a computer, with an emphasis on creating two-dimensional and three-dimensional graphics using a standard API such as WebGL or OpenGL. Students will use the facilities provided by a standard API to express basic transformations such as scaling, rotation, and translation of images. Additional topics include: introduction to Maya, performance issues, collision detection, real-time graphics and interaction. Prerequisites: CSC 2710 and MTH 2310 or equivalent.
Four credits.
CSC 3460 Networking and Network Programming (Offered Odd Fall Semesters)
An introduction to the basic concepts of network technologies and network programming. Attention will be given to a layer model such as the Open System Interconnect (OSI) model. Students will be engaged in projects that may include the implementation of a network application, networking technology assessment, network performance evaluation, and network administration. Prerequisites: CSC 2342, CSC 2410, and CSC 2710. Four credits.
CSC 3810 Introduction to Information Security (Offered Spring Semesters)
This course introduces basic information security concepts including confidentiality, integrity, assurance, availability, and common risks and threats. It also covers common cryptographic primitives: encryption, hash functions, message authentication, and digital signatures and examines specific algorithms and their use in security solutions. Applied topics such as malicious software, intrusion
detection and prevention, denial of service attacks, physical security threats and recovery, Linux Operating System Security, buffer overflows, and secure software development will also be explored with the help of hands-on lab activities, coding assignments, and a research project. Prerequisite:CSC 1720. Four credits.
CSC 3940 System Security (Offered Fall Semesters)
A practical course covering the basic concepts that are essential to security of operating systems, networks, software and various computing support systems. Focus will be on creating and exploring systems with a vulnerability, recreating how attacks on the system exposed the vulnerability, system administration tasks related to system hardening, penetration testing, and security monitoring. Topics will include user account and privilege management, software installation, web site configuration, workstation cloning, clustering, and backups in a variety of environments including Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. Prerequisite: CSC 2410. Four credits.
CSC 4210 Operating Systems (Offered Spring Semesters)
An introduction to the various components of an operating system, including schedulers, memory management, interrupt handling, resource allocation, security and protection. Examples presented will be based on UNIX and other popular operating systems. Each student will participate in projects that involve kernel modifications, shell scripting, and simulations of components within the operating system. Prerequisites: CSC 1720 and CSC 2342, AND either CSC 2410 or ECE 2605. Four credits.
CSC 4310 High Performance Computing (Offered Fall Semesters)
A study of both hardware and software issues connected with solving a problem in a parallel processing environment which may include grid computing, cluster computing, or special hardware configurations such as a multi-core processor. Emphasis will be placed on identifying the basic properties of bandwidth, latency, scalability and granularity as it relates to an algorithmic solution to a problem. Students will design, code, test and debug programs for stated environments. Prerequisites: CSC 2710 and CSC 2410.
Four credits.
CSC 4460 Computer Vision (Offered Odd Spring Semesters)
This course introduces students to basic concepts and techniques in computer vision. Students successfully completing this course will be able to apply a variety of computer techniques for the design of efficient algorithms for real world applications, such as optical character recognition, face detection and recognition, motion estimation, human tracking, and gesture recognition. The topics covered include image filters, edge detection, feature extraction, object detection, object recognition, tracking, gesture recognition, image formation and camera models, and stereo vision. Prerequisites: CSC 3250 and CSC 3360. Four credits.
CSC 4510 Programming Language Design and Translation (Offered Fall Semesters)
A study of the various programming language paradigms and basic program language translation. Emphasis
will be on run-time behavior, lexical analysis, parsing contextfree languages, translation specifications, and machine independent code improvement. Each student will participate in programming projects to demonstrate various concepts. Prerequisites: CSC 2410, CSC 2710, and CSC 2342. Four credits.
CSC 4710 Software Engineering (Offered Spring Semesters)
This capstone course studies the principles and practices of software engineering covering the software development life cycle. The focus will be software design from an object-oriented perspective, covering abstraction, encapsulation, data protection, inheritance, composition and polymorphism. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the software development life cycle through team projects. Prerequisites: CSC 2212, CSC 2710, and Senior standing. Four credits.
CSC 4910 Undergraduate Research I (Offered Spring Semesters)
Investigation of some topic in computer science to a deeper and broader extent than typically done in a classroom situation. Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of the instructor. Two credits.
CSC 4920 Undergraduate Research II (Offered Spring Semesters)
A continuation of CSC 4910. At the conclusion of the course, results will be given in both a written paper and an oral presentation to the seminar participants and the department faculty. Prerequisite: CSC 4910. Two credits.
MTH 1410 Calculus I
Differential and integral calculus of functions of a single real variable, including trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The course will cover limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of derivatives, introduction to integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and definite integrals. Derivatives and integrals are explored graphically,symbolically, and numerically. Prerequisite: MTH 1400 witha grade of C- or higher, or placement. Four credits.
MTH 1415 Mathematics for Engineers
This course, together with MTH 1425 Mathematics for Engineers II, provides an introduction to the basic
concepts and techniques of differential and integral calculus, emphasizing their inter-relationships and applications to engineering and the sciences, introduces students to the use of computers in mathematics, and develops problem solving skills with both theoretical and practical problems. Topics include limits, continuity, parametric curves, techniques for and applications of (e.g. optimization) differentiation of functions of one variable and the techniques for integrals of functions of one variable. Credit will not be given for both MTH 1415 and MTH 1410. Prerequisite: MTH 1400 with a grade of C- or higher, or placement. Four credits.
MTH 1420 Calculus II
Integration: techniques and applications to geometry, physics, economics, and probability. Sequences, series, power series, Taylor’s Theorem, and elementary differential equations. Introduction to surfaces in space and cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Prerequisite: MTH 1400 or MTH 1415 with a grade of C- or higher. Four credits.
MTH 1425 Mathematics for Engineers II
This course together with MTH 1415 Mathematics for Engineers I, provides an introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of differential and integral calculus, emphasizing their inter-relationships and applications to engineering and the sciences, introduces students to the use of computers in mathematics, and develops problem solving skills with both theoretical and practical problems. Topics include applications of (e.g. volumes, hydrostatic force) integrals of functions of one variable, separable and linear first order differential equations, sequences and series, and power series. Credit will not be given for both MTH 1425 and MTH 1420. Prerequisite: MTH 1415 or MTH 1410 with a Cor higher. Four credits.
MTH 2050 Mathematical Methods in Engineering and Physics I
An introduction to the applications of mathematical techniques to physical problems in mechanics, classical field theory and electronic circuits. Topics include the use of differential equations and complex numbers in modeling mechanical systems, multivariable calculus and vector analysis. This course cannot be used to count for the major or minor in mathematics. Prerequisites: PHY 2010 and either MTH 1420 or MTH 1425. This course is offered in the fall. Four credits.
MTH 2310 Linear Algebra
Systems of linear equations and matrices, determinants, vector spaces and innerproduct spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues andeigenvectors. The emphasis is on computational techniques and applications. Prerequisite: MTH 1410. Four credits.
MTH 2410 Calculus III
Vectors and geometry in space. The dot and cross products, lines, planes, surfaces in space. Calculus of vector functions, including functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients, directional derivatives, maxima and minima. The course will also cover multiple integration, line and surface integrals, Green’s Theorem, Divergence Theorems, Stokes’ Theorem, andapplications. Prerequisite: MTH 1420 with a grade of C- or higher. Four credits.
MTH 3150 Probability
Set functions, events, addition and multiplication rules, combinatorial probability, conditional probability and independence, Bayes’ Theorem, discrete distributions, continuous distributions, multivariate distributions, transformations, expectation and moments, moment generating functions, and the Central Limit Theorem. Prerequisite: MTH 1420. Four credits.
MTH3810 Combinatorics
Basic principles of counting: addition and multiplication principles, enumeration techniques, including generating functions, recurrence formulas, rook polynomials, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, and Polya’s theorem. This course will also cover basic concepts of graph theory: graphs, digraphs,
connectedness, trees and graph colorings. Prerequisite: MTH 2210. Four credits.
MTH/CSC 3910 Numerical Methods
Algorithm behavior and applicability. Interpolation, roots of equations, systems of linear equations and matrix inversion, numerical integration, numerical methods for ordinary differential equations, and matrix eigenvalue problems. Prerequisites: MTH 2310 and CSC 1710. Four credits.
STS 2910 Introduction to Statistical Analysis with SAS Applications
This course is a calculus based introduction to statistics. Topics include: populations; sampling; random variables and their distributions; sampling distributions; one- and two-sample inference, chi-square tests, and simple linear regression. SAS statistical software to will be used describe data and perform standard inference procedures. Prerequisites: MTH 1310 or MTH 1410. Four credits.
STS 3005 Probability and Statistics for Engineers
This course provides an introduction to calculus-based statistics and probability theory, with an emphasis on solving problems related to engineering. Topics in statistics include sample mean and variance, correlation, regression, sampling distributions, and hypothesis testing. Topics in
probability include discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, and the Central Limit Theorem. The principles of experimental design and statistical process control are introduced. Prerequisite: MTH 1420 or MTH 1425. Four credits.
BIO 1500 Principles of Cell Biology
This course is a study of the general principles of living systems with a focus on the chemical, cellular, and metabolic levels of biological organization. The acquisition of primary literature
via electronic data retrieval systems will be emphasized. Students will learn to read and interpret research and review papers, write summaries and present scientific information orally. Corequisite: BIO 1501. Three credits.
BIO 1501 Principles of Cell Biology Lab
An introductory lab course focused on the chemical, cellular, and metabolic levels of biological organization. The acquisition of basic scientific lab skills including data analysis will be emphasized. Students will learn to preform cell biology techniques, develop and interpret graphical
representations of their data, and communicate scientific information in written and oral formats. Corequisite: BIO 1500. One credit.
BIO 2001 Principles of Genetics
This course covers all major topics in the field of genetics including transmission genetics, molecular genetics, population genetics, and evolutionary genetics. The application of genetic concepts to the fields of medicine, biotechnology, and agriculture will be emphasized. Students will also learn to read and interpret research and review papers, write summaries and present scientific information orally.
Prerequisite: BIO 1500/1501 with a grade of C- or higher. Corequisite: BIO 2001L. Three credits.
BIO 2001L Principles of Genetics Lab
This laboratory covers major techniques and experiments in the field of genetics including transmission genetics, molecular genetics, population genetics, and evolutionary genetics. The acquisition of basic scientific lab skills including data analysis will be emphasized. Students will also learn to read and interpret research and review papers, write summaries and present scientific information orally.
Corequisite: BIO 2001. One credit.
CHM 1010 General Chemistry I
Matter is examined by a study of the atom, compounds, chemical nomenclature, formulas, the periodic table, and chemical reactions. Other topics include the gas Laws, Lewis structures, and thermochemistry. Corequisite: CHM 1011. Course is offered in the fall. Three credits.
CHM 1011 General Chemistry I Laboratory
This course consists of a series of laboratories which reinforce the concepts being studied in CHM 1010. In addition to learning problem solving and critical thinking skills, students will be introduced to laboratory safety and gain hands-on experience using a variety of laboratory equipment and techniques. Corequisite: CHM 1010. Course is offered in the fall. One credit.
CHM 1020 General Chemistry II
Matter is examined by a study of the atom, compounds, chemical nomenclature, formulas, the periodic table, and chemical reactions. Other topics include kinetics, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, coordination chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 1010 with a grade of C- or higher. Course is offered in the spring. Three credits.
CHM 1021 General Chemistry II Laboratory
This course consists of a series of laboratories which reinforce the concepts being studied in CHM 1020. In addition to learning problem solving and critical thinking skills, students will be introduced to laboratory safety and gain hands-on experience using a variety of laboratory equipment and
techniques. Prerequisite: CHM 1011 with a grade of C- or higher. Corequisite: CHM 1020. Course is offered in the spring. One credit.
PHY2010 Fundamentals of Physics I
A calculusbased study of mechanics, waves, and thermal physics with emphasis on atomic models and fundamental principles. This course satisfies the Area II General Education elective in Natural Science. Topics include various applications of fundamental principles to matter and interactions, including classical, relativistic, and quantum systems. Prerequisite or corequisite: MTH 1410. This
course consists of 4 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week. PHY 2010 must be taken concurrently with the lab (PHY 2010L). Four credits.
PHY 2020 Fundamentals of Physics II
A calculusbased study of electricity and magnetism, and geometrical and physical optics, with emphasis on atomic models, fields, and the classical interaction of light and matter. Prerequisite or corequisite: MTH 1420. This course consists of 4 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week.
PHY 2020 must be taken concurrently with the lab (PHY 2020L). Four credits.
PHY 2200 Computational Physics
A projectbased introduction to computational physics through computational modeling. Students will learn to construct, solve, validate, and communicate mathematical models of physical systems. Topics include numerical techniques for solving ordinary and partial differential equations, data analysis, error analysis, and parallel computing. Applications of modeling across a variety of areas, including statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and non-linear dynamics, will be explored. Prerequisites: PHY 2010 and CSC 1710. Four credits.

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS

The High Point Admissions Office is Located in Wrenn Hall.

Tours are available 7 days a week. Please contact us to schedule your visit.
(800) 345-6993
(336) 841-9216
(336) 888-6382 (fax)
admiss@highpoint.edu

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